OSHA Cites Steel Manufacturer

The Conshohocken, Pa. plant of ArcelorMittal was cited for eight alleged violations involving hexavalent chromium and other hazards.

OSHA has cited ArcelorMittal for eight eight alleged safety and health violations at its steel plate plant in Conshohocken, Pa., adjacent to Philadelphia. OSHA's proposed penalties are $66,300, according to the agency's news release.

The agency said its inspection of the site was prompted by a complaint and also conducted as part of the national emphasis program for hexavalent chromium and primary metals. Several other types of violations are alleged, however, including repeat violations involving open-sided floors or platforms and 11 serious violations for a lack of annual audiometric testing and training, lack of guarding for power transmission devices, electrical hazards, deficiencies in training for powered industrial trucks, a lack of training on respiratory protection and fitting workers for protective equipment, and exposing workers to hexavalent chromium at more than four times the permissible level, according to OSHA. The release says 295 employees work at the plant.

According to ArcelorMittal, which is among the world's largest steelmakers, the plant is the largest supplier of armored plate to the U.S. military. It makes plates ranging in thickness from 3/16 inches to 3 inches for bridge construction, railcars, ships, and other uses.

The parent company announced its results for the January-June 2012 period on July 25, including an improved lost-time injury rate of 0.8 per 1 million hours worked by employees and contractors during the second quarter of 2012. The company's rate during the first quarter was 1.1.

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