NSC: Practice Ergonomics for Smarter, Safer Workplace

Ergonomic conditions are disorders of the soft tissues often caused by factors such as overexertion while lifting, lowering, pushing, pulling or reaching, among other causes.

The National Safety Council today launched Ergonomics week as part of National Safety Month, an annual observance to educate and encourage safe behaviors around top causes of preventable injuries and deaths. This week, NSC is releasing helpful information and materials on preventing ergonomic conditions, such as overexertion.

According to the Injury Facts 2012 Edition, overexertion is the third leading cause of unintentional injuries in the United States, accounting for about 3.2 million emergency department visits. Ergonomic conditions are disorders of the soft tissues often caused by factors such as overexertion while lifting, lowering, pushing, pulling or reaching, among other causes. Ergonomic conditions are best dealt with when caught early.

The signs of ergonomic conditions include:

  • pain
  • swelling
  • numbness
  • tingling
  • tenderness
  • clicking
  • loss of grip strength

“At Proto Industrial Tools, we seek to improve workplace ergonomics through product design and training,” said Alan English, senior brand manager of Stanley Black & Decker Industrial Distribution. “Knowing the right tool to use and how to properly use it is crucial to preventing injuries due to overexertion, especially in industrial situations. Utilizing a torque multiplier or properly sized wrench can help reduce the effort required to turn a fastener, improving worker safety.”

Posters, tip sheets and quizzes are available for free download at nsc.org/nsm.

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