World's Aircraft Demand Still Growing

Top officials from Boeing, which now forecasts a $4.5 trillion market in new airplanes during the next 20 years, and other big names in the industry are heading to London for the Farnborough Airshow.

One of the biggest aviation events in the world, the Farnborough Airshow, is about to begin, and the outlook for aircraft manufacturers could hardly be brighter. Boeing announced July 3 that it now projects 34,000 new airplanes, a $4.5 trillion market, will be needed in the next 20 years as the current world fleet doubles in size. Airbus announced a day earlier that it will begin assembling A320 aircraft in the United States for the first time on an assembly line in Mobile, Ala., where Airbus already has an engineering center.

"The time is right for Airbus to expand in America," said Fabrice Brégier, president and CEO of Airbus. "The U.S. is the largest single-aisle aircraft market in the world, with a projected need for 4,600 aircraft over the next 20 years, and this assembly line brings us closer to our customers. Mobile is now becoming part of Airbus' global production network, joining our successful and growing assembly lines in Hamburg, Toulouse and Tianjin."

Randy Tinseth, Boeing Commercial Airplanes' VP of marketing, announced the numbers from the Boeing 2012 Current Market Outlook ahead of the Farnborough event outside London. The airshow takes place July 9-15. "The world's aviation market is broader, deeper, and more diverse than we've ever seen it," said Tinseth. "It has proven to be resilient even during some very challenging years and is driving production rate increases across the board."

Boeing expects single-aisle aircraft demand to grow even as demand for wide-body aircraft outpaces it, with the latter category accounting for almost $2.5 trillion of new airplane deliveries.

About 120,000 people attended the 2010 Farnborough Airshow, where manufacturers announced $47 billion worth of orders. The event is held in alternate years for one week in July, with five trade days followed by a weekend open to the public.

Download Center

  • Safety Metrics Guide

    Is your company leveraging its safety data and analytics to maintain a safe workplace? With so much data available, where do you start? This downloadable guide will give you insight on helpful key performance indicators (KPIs) you should track for your safety program.

  • Job Hazard Analysis Guide

    This guide includes details on how to conduct a thorough Job Hazard Analysis, and it's based directly on an OSHA publication for conducting JHAs. Learn how to identify potential hazards associated with each task of a job and set controls to mitigate hazard risks.

  • A Guide to Practicing “New Safety”

    Learn from safety professionals from around the world as they share their perspectives on various “new views” of safety, including Safety Differently, Safety-II, No Safety, Human and Organizational Performance (HOP), Resilience Engineering, and more in this helpful guide.

  • Lone Worker Safety Guide

    As organizations digitalize and remote operations become more commonplace, the number of lone workers is on the rise. These employees are at increased risk for unaddressed workplace accidents or emergencies. This guide was created to help employers better understand common lone worker risks and solutions for lone worker risk mitigation and incident prevention.

  • EHS Software Buyer's Guide

    Learn the keys to staying organized, staying sharp, and staying one step ahead on all things safety. This buyer’s guide is designed for you to use in your search for the safety management solution that best suits your company’s needs.

  • Vector Solutions

Featured Whitepaper

OH&S Digital Edition

  • OHS Magazine Digital Edition - July August 2022

    July / August 2022

    Featuring:

    • CONFINED SPACES
      Specific PPE is Needed for Entry and Exit
    • HAZARD COMMUNICATION
      Three Quick Steps to Better HazCom Training
    • GAS DETECTION
      Building a Chemical Emergency Toolkit
    • RESPIRATORY PROTECTION
      The Last Line of Defense
    View This Issue