Texas Work-Related Injuries, Illnesses Decrease in 2010

With the 2010 decrease, Texas has seen a decline in such workplace injuries and illnesses for four years in a row, according to the Texas Department of Insurance Division of Workers’ Compensation.

Private industry employers in Texas reported a 5.8 percent decrease in nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work during 2010 for a total of 56,720.

With the 2010 decrease, Texas has seen a decline in such workplace injuries and illnesses for four years in a row, according to the Texas Department of Insurance Division of Workers’ Compensation (TDI-DWC).

The annual Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) Survey of Occupational Injuries and Illnesses revealed that there were 79.5 injuries and illnesses per 10,000 full-time equivalent employees in Texas. This rate was 2.1 percent lower than the rate of 81.2 in 2009 and is below the national rate of 118.

The median days away from work, a key measure of severity of injuries and illnesses, for Texas increased to 9 in 2010 from 8 in 2008 and 2009. This is higher than the 8 median days away from work reported nationally.

The survey is conducted in cooperation with the TDI-DWC, which collects survey data in order to assist employers, safety professionals, and policymakers in identifying occupational safety and health issues in the state.

Number of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work:

  • 2008 – 64,700
  • 2009 – 60,240
  • 2010 – 56,720

Incidence rates of nonfatal occupational injuries and illnesses involving days away from work per 10,000 full-time employees:

  • 2008 – 84.6
  • 2009 – 81.2
  • 2010 – 79.5

Median days away from work:

  • 2008 – 8
  • 2009 – 8
  • 2010 – 9
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