Counties Feeling Pinched on Transportation Safety

NTSB Member Mark Rosekind pointed this out in a July 20 blog post about his recent speech to the National Association of Counties' Transportation Steering Committee.

County governments and officials have many responsibilities when it comes to transportation safety across almost all modes, National Transportation Safety Board member Mark R. Rosekind, Ph.D., pointed out in a July 20 post on the NTSB Safety Compass blog. In it, he discusses a recent speech he gave at the National Association of Counties' 77th Annual Conference in Pittsburgh, Pa., where Rosekind spoke to the NACo Transportation Steering Committee.

He writes that these local leaders "know that being prepared for the possibility of a major transportation accident in their county is critical."

The committee works on project development and financing; transportation planning; highways; public transit; airports; railroads; waterways; and research and development of new transportation modes. "An area that I highlighted was the integrity of our nation's infrastructure using pipeline safety as an example and focusing on the PG&E San Bruno, California, pipeline explosion and Enbridge Marshall, Michigan, oil spill," Rosekind writes. "One concrete action for participants: ensure that their first responders know where pipelines are located in their county, what is transported through them, and contacts/actions needed to address a problem.

"It was clear from my discussion with NACo members and staff that all counties are feeling the pressure to fill funding gaps, especially in the area of transportation safety," he adds. "As state and local governments continue efforts to enhance transportation safety, their interests directly intersect the NTSB and its mission. By increasing dialogue, partnerships, and information sharing with community leaders in counties, towns, and cities, everyone will reap tremendous long-term benefits for making America a safer place to travel."

Sworn in June 30, 2010, Rosekind is serving a term that will expire Dec. 31, 2014.

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