Washington's Workplace Fatality Rate Drops to Lowest Level on Record

In recent years, Washington has averaged between 80 and 90 work-related deaths annually. The previous low was in 2009 when 65 workers died on the job.

After years of steady decline, deaths in Washington state due to fatal workplace injuries fell to 51 in 2011, the lowest number of work-related deaths in the state’s history.

The deaths, based on preliminary data, are reported in the Washington FACE 2011 Work-Related Fatalities Report. Researchers counted deaths from traumatic injuries or acute chemical exposures. Deaths due to illnesses related to work are not included in this report.

The report is compiled by the Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation (FACE) program, which is managed by researchers with the state’s Safety and Health Assessment and Research for Prevention (SHARP) program. FACE is part of a national program designed to identify and study workplace fatalities.

In recent years, Washington has averaged between 80 and 90 work-related deaths annually. The previous low was in 2009 when 65 workers died on the job.

The 2011 report noted that fewer workers in the agriculture, forestry, fishing, and manufacturing industries died on the job. There were also fewer incidents involving multiple victims.

Researchers also noted:

  • On-the-job motor vehicle accidents were the number one cause of workplace fatalities in 2011 with 19 deaths, eight of which involved heavy or tractor trailer truck drivers.
  • Small businesses with 10 or fewer workers accounted for a third of all workplace fatalities.
  • The 50-59 age group of workers suffered the most deaths.
  • Fatalities in the construction industry continued to remain low, with six deaths reported in 2011.

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