Hawaii Governor to Veto Motorcycle Bill

Gov. David Ige plans to veto HB 2589, a bill that would authorize the state Department of Transportation to allow two-wheeled motorcycles to drive in designated shoulder lanes. Ige said the bill would compromise road safety and create more dangers for operators of all vehicles.

Hawaii Gov. David Ige notified legislative leaders and key lawmakers on June 25 of his Intent to Veto list, which includes 11 bills. The Hawai‘i State Constitution requires the governor to notify the Legislature of the Intent to Veto list no later than the 35th day after adjournment, which was June 25. On July 10, any measure the governor has not signed or not vetoed will become law without his signature.

The list includes:

  • HB 2589, a bill that would authorize the state Department of Transportation to allow two-wheeled motorcycles to drive in designated shoulder lanes. Ige said his rationale for vetoing it is that the shoulder lane is designated to accommodate stopped vehicles and emergency vehicles on highways, as well as bicycles on arterial roadways. The concern is that the bill would compromise road safety and create more dangers for operators of all vehicles.
  • SB 2407, a bill that would authorize the use of medical marijuana as a treatment for opioid addiction, substance use, and withdrawal symptoms resulting from the treatment of these conditions. Ige's rationale is that "The Department of Health already has a formal evidenced-based petition process, made available annually to patients and physicians, so patients and physicians can apply to add qualifying conditions to the list of uses for medical cannabis."
  • SB 2519, a measure to authorize the Agribusiness Development Corporation to enter into contracts with private businesses to remove select municipal solid waste, glass, and food/green waste from the waste stream for use in other businesses, provided that it benefits agriculture and agriculture-related projects. The governor's rationale is that the bill would interfere with counties' authority to direct the disposal of municipal solid waste to specific locations under a statute authorizing counties to require that solid waste be disposed of at designated facilities or areas. It is unclear, he concluded, whether ADC's or the counties' authority would have priority when determining control over the municipal waste disposal.

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