NTSB Meeting This Week on 2016 O'Hare Incident

The Associated Press reported last July that NTSB determined a high-pressure turbine disk in the right engine broke into four pieces, which shot out of the engine's housing, and that the board has identified at least three previous uncontained engine failures in commercial airliners in which a disk from the same family of GE engines failed.

The National Transportation Safety Board is scheduled to meet Jan. 23 to determine the probable cause of the Oct. 28, 2016, American Airlines flight 383 uncontained engine failure at Chicago O'Hare International Airport. The Boeing 767-300 experienced the failure of the right engine during the takeoff roll on runway 28R.

One passenger received serious injuries during the evacuation, and the aircraft was substantially damaged by the resultant fire. There were 161 passengers and nine crew members aboard the flight, a scheduled trip to Miami International Airport.

The meeting is scheduled to start at 9:30 a.m. Eastern time in the NTSB Boardroom and Conference Center in Washington, D.C.; a link to a live webcast of the meeting will be available shortly before the start of the meeting at http://ntsb.capitolconnection.org/.

The Associated Press reported last July that NTSB determined a high-pressure turbine disk in the right engine broke into four pieces, which shot out of the engine's housing, and that the board has identified at least three previous uncontained engine failures in commercial airliners in which a disk from the same family of GE engines failed.

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