NSP Turns 70, Names 7 to National Safety Team

Founded in 1938, the National Ski Patrol this year is celebrating 70 years of service and safety, and, according to Executive Director Tim White, it is thus the perfect time to revive its historic Safety Team. The association's 27,000 members represent 98 percent of the nation's partrollers, but only seven from across the country were chosen for the team to serve as "visible ambassadors" for ski and snowboard safety over the next two years.

"This is a tremendous opportunity for NSP members to be recognized for their contributions to slope safety and make the slopes even safer," White said. "We received many applications from strong candidates, but the seven that were chosen have truly gone the extra mile to make the slopes a safer experience for the skiing and riding public."

Dubbed "The Magnificent Seven," the NSP Safety Team is a diverse group that includes Paul Baugher (Crystal Mountain, Wash.), Dennis McMahan (Apple Mountain, Mich.), Jim Phillipe (Aspen, Colo.), Craig Simson (Keystone, Colo.), Ed Strapp (Sugarloaf, Maine), Jean Webb (Sugar Mountain, N.C.), and Lonny Whitcomb (Liberty Mountain, Pa.). All are active ski patrollers who were chosen for their demonstrable successes in ski and snowboard safety, from avalanche education to terrain park safety to community outreach. Each will participate in a variety of NSP safety programs and initiatives, will apply their experience to safety-related focus groups and industry discussions, and will be featured in NSP materials--starting with safety tips at www.nsp.org, where each team member's bio is also available.

Today is the final official day of NSP's National Safety Awareness Week, but its Web site always maintains current safety information, conditioning tips, checklists, and information about NSP's education programs. White said the association is currently seeking to recruit patrollers nationwide, and details about that are also at the site, or you may call White or April Darrow at 303-988-1111 for more information.

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