FDNY Graduates 32 Fire Inspection Inspectors

"Every single one of the dedicated men and women who serve as fire inspectors are absolutely critical to the department's ability to protect life and property in our city," said First Deputy Commissioner Laura Kavanagh. "Simply put, our Bureau of Fire Prevention makes our city safer every single day."

The New York City Fire Department held a graduation ceremony on Feb. 20 for 32 Probationary Fire Protection Inspectors at its headquarters in Brooklyn.

FDNY's Bureau of Fire Prevention has more than 250 inspectors who are trained in inspection oversight and reporting, including training pertaining to the NYC Fire Code, the NYC Building Code, and various administrative and field-related protocols. "Every single one of the dedicated men and women who serve as fire inspectors are absolutely critical to the department's ability to protect life and property in our city," said First Deputy Commissioner Laura Kavanagh. "Simply put, our Bureau of Fire Prevention makes our city safer every single day."

"I decided to become a fire protection inspector because I have seen the effects of what a fire can do to someone. I really wanted to find a job that was meaningful," said Inspector Michelle Lee, who graduated as valedictorian of her class. "Starting this training was very nerve-wracking and I knew it would be difficult, but my classmates and I were instrumental to each other's successes. These are amazing people. I'm excited to protect the residents of the city I not only live in, but that I was born and raised in."

Probationary inspectors receive 11 weeks of training at the Fire Academy, more than 100 hours of New York State Peace Officer training, and have been schooled in fire protection enforcement activities that entail the issuance of violations, FDNY summonses, and serving NYS Criminal Court summonses. After receiving basic training, they may be assigned to several units within the Bureau of Fire Prevention, including District Officers, Fire Suppression Units, the Bulk Fuel Safety Unit, and the Hazardous Cargo Inspection Unit. The inspectors identify, monitor, and inspect various locations, conditions, or equipment that may pose a fire safety hazard to life and property.

"With every successful inspection you perform, you are preventing a fire, an injury, or even a potential loss of life," Acting Chief of Department John Sudnik said.

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