Panel Finds OSHA Lead Exposure Standard Inadequate

A new report from a National Research Council committee says the current standard sets limits that do not protect personnel working on military firing ranges from harmful exposures.

A new National Research Council report concludes the current OSHA general industry standard for lead exposure, 29 CFR 1910.1025, is not sufficiently protective, given that blood lead levels below what the 34-year-old standard regards as safe are known to cause health problems.

The standard sets an action level of 30 micrograms per cubic meter of air (µg/m3) as an eight-hour TWA and requires medical surveillance of workers exposed above that level for more than 30 days per year, and an employee with a blood lead level of 60 µg/dL of higher of three consecutive blood lead levels average 50 or higher must be removed from work involving lead exposure. But the report's summary points out that the U.S. National Toxicology Program and EPA have identified health effects below 10 µg/dL, and in some cases as low as 5 µg/dL. The report says adverse kidney effects occur with blood lead levels of 8-12 µg/dL, while adverse cardiovascular effects are seen at BLLs below 10 µg/dL.

Hearing loss, increased blood pressure, impaired balance, and other adverse effects also occur below 30 µg/dL, according to the report, which cites a model showing that an average worker who is exposed at the OSHA action level for one year would have a BLL of about 30 µg/dL as a result.

The Department of Defense asked the National Research Council to evaluate employees' potential health risks from recurring exposures at firing ranges. "Data collected for the last 5 years show that the OSHA PEL for lead of 50 µg/m3 was frequently exceeded on Army, Navy, and Air Force firing ranges, in some cases by several orders of magnitude. [Blood lead level] data on firing-range personnel were not available from either the Army or the Navy, but the Air Force reported that BLLs of its firing range personnel were all under 40 µg/dL," the summary states.

Based on its review of the epidemiological and toxicologic data, the committee concluded "there is overwhelming evidence that the OSHA standard provides inadequate protection for DOD firing-range personnel and for any other worker populations covered by the general industry standard. Specifically, the premise that maintaining BLLS under 40 µg/dL for a working lifetime will protect workers adequately is not valid; by inference, the OSHA PEL and action level are also inadequate for protecting firing-range workers," according to the report.

It notes that the American College of Occupational and Environmental Medicine has recommended medical removal of workers with BLLs above 20 µg/dL.

The committee recommended that DoD consider switching from lead bullets to nylon-clad, copper-jacketed, zinc-based, or other alternative ammunition types, though these would be more expensive. The department also should improve ranges' design and ventilation, should keep them cleaner, and should consider requiring exposed workers to use a mixture of isostearamidopropyl morpholine lactate and citric acid, applied with a textured absorbent material, to decontaminate their hands after exposures.

For more information, visit http://national-academies.org.

Download Center

  • Lone Worker Safety Guide

    As organizations digitalize and remote operations become more commonplace, the number of lone workers is on the rise. These employees are at increased risk for unaddressed workplace accidents or emergencies. This guide was created to help employers better understand common lone worker risks and solutions for lone worker risk mitigation and incident prevention.

  • Online Safety Training Buyer's Guide

    Use this handy buyer's guide to learn the basics of selecting online safety training and how to use it at your workplace.

  • COVID Return-to-Work Checklist, Fall 2021

    Use this checklist as an aid to help your organization return to work during the COVID-19 pandemic in a safe and healthy manner.

  • SDS Buyer's Guide

    Learn to make informed decisions while searching for SDS Management Software.

  • Risk Matrix Guide

    Risk matrices come in many different shapes and sizes. Understanding the components of a risk matrix will allow you and your organization to manage risk effectively.

  • Industry Safe

Featured Whitepapers

OH&S Digital Edition

  • OHS Magazine Digital Edition - November December 2021

    November December 2021

    Featuring:

    • GAS DETECTION
      How to Streamline Gas Detector Maintenance
    • OSHA TOP 10
      OSHA's Top 10 Most Frequently Cited Standards for FY 2021
    • PROTECTIVE APPAREL
      How PPE Can Help You Deal with the Harsh Condition of Winter
    • HEARING PROTECTION
      Tackling Hearing Protection in the Workplace
    View This Issue