CPSC to Enforce New Children's Product Safety Requirements

On Aug. 14, 2009, new requirements of the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA) will take effect that are aimed at making children's products safer and increasing consumer confidence in the marketplace.

The Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC) said it is educating domestic and overseas manufacturers, importers, and distributors of children's products and other consumer goods of these important new safety requirements.

CPSC Chairman Inez Tenenbaum said CPSIA's new requirements will help protect families and she urged businesses to comply. "I will ensure that these requirements are enforced vigorously and fairly," Tenenbaum said. "By ensuring that toys and other children’s products meet strict lead limits and can be tracked in the event of a recall, I believe children will be better protected in their homes."

The requirements that become effective on August 14 include:

  • Lead Content

    The limit for lead in children's products drops from 600 parts per million (ppm) to 300 ppm. After Aug. 14, it will be unlawful to manufacture, import, sell, or offer for sale, a children's product that has more than 300 ppm of lead in any part (except electronics) that is accessible to children.

  • Lead in Paint and Similar Surface Coating Materials

    The limit for lead in paint and similar surface-coating materials for consumer use drops from 600 ppm to 90 ppm. The lead paint limits also apply to toys and other articles intended for children as well as certain furniture products. Products subject to these limits cannot be sold, offered for sale, imported or manufactured after August 14 unless they meet the new lower lead limits.

  • Civil Penalties

    Civil penalties increase substantially to a maximum of $100,000 per violation and up to a maximum of $15 million for a related series of violations. Previously, civil penalties were a maximum of $8,000 per violation and up to a maximum of $1.825 million for a related series of violations.

  • Tracking Labels

    Manufacturers must place permanent distinguishing marks (tracking label) on any consumer product primarily intended for children 12 and younger made on or after Aug. 14, 2009. The permanent marks must enable consumers to ascertain basic information, including the manufacturer or private labeler, location, the date of manufacture, and more detailed information on the manufacturing process such as a batch or run number. The permanent distinguishing marks must appear on the product itself and its packaging to the extent practicable. Learn more about the tracking label requirement at www.cpsc.gov/about/cpsia/sect103.html#faqs.

  • Catalog Advertising

    Advertising for certain toys and games intended for use by children from three to six years old must have warnings regarding potential choking hazards to children younger than three. The requirement to include warnings in Internet advertisements went into effect on Dec. 12, 2008. There was a grace period for the requirement for catalogues and other printed materials, but this grace period expired Aug. 9, 2009. All catalogues and other printed materials distributed on or after Aug. 9, 2009, regardless of when they were printed, must include the appropriate warnings.

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