NYC to Increase Safety Training Requirements for Construction Workers

Workers can fulfill the 40-hour training requirement in many ways, including taking a 30-hour OSHA-approved safety course plus 8 hours of fall prevention training and two hours of training on drug and alcohol awareness.

New York City Buildings Commissioner Rick Chandler announced last week increased safety training requirements for many of the city’s construction workers. The Department of Buildings will require workers at certain job sites to have 40 hours of safety training and supervisors to have 62 hours of training.

These requirements apply to workers at sites for which the DOB requires construction superintendents, site-safety coordinators, or site-safety managers. The changes will take effect in stages over the next 12 to 28 months.

In March 2018, these workers were required to have at least 10 hours of safety training, but by December 1, 2018, they will be required to have 30 hours of training and supervisors will need to be trained for 62 hours. By May 1, 2019, the training requirement will increase to 40 hours of safety training. If DOB determines that there is insufficient training capacity, these deadlines can be extended.

“Most construction accidents are preventable, which is why increased safety training is so important,” Chandler said. “Every worker who leaves for the job site in the morning deserves to come home safely at night.”

Workers can fulfill the 40-hour training requirement in many ways, including taking a 30-hour OSHA-approved safety course plus 8 hours of fall prevention training and two hours of training on drug and alcohol awareness. The DOB must approve safety-training course providers.

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  • OHS Magazine Digital Edition - May 2020

    May 2020

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