OSHA & ANSI Inspections

Do you know the difference between OSHA & ANSI Inspections?

OSHA & ANSI Inspections have different regulations. Do you know if you are compliant? Let’s examine each set of standards to fully understand the differences.

ANSI Inspection Standards

According to ANSI/ASSE Z359.2-2007 American National Standards Section 5.5.2 Fall protection equipment shall be inspected by the authorized person at least once at the beginning of each eight hour shift in which it is used to verify that it has not sustained any wear or damage that would require its removal from service. Fall protection and fall rescue equipment shall be inspected on a regular basis not to exceed one year (or more frequently if required by the manufacturer’s instructions) by a competent person or a competent rescuer, as appropriate, to verify that the equipment is safe for use. The inspection shall be documented and shall include (but is not limited to):

  • Absence or illegibility of markings or tags
  • Absence of any elements affecting the equipment form, fit or function
  • Evidence of defects in or damage to hardware elements including cracks, sharp edges, deformation, corrosion, chemical attack, excessive heating, alteration, or excessive wear
  • Evidence of defects in, or damage to, straps or ropes (fraying, unsplicing, enlaying, kinking, knotting, roping, broken or pulled stitches, soiling, abrasion, alteration, needed or excessive lubrication, excessive aging, or excessive wear)
  • Alteration, absence of parts, or evidence of defects in, damage to, or improper function of, mechanical devices and connectors
  • Any other condition that calls to question the suitability of the equipment for its intended purpose

Fall protection and fall rescue equipment shall be taken out of service when any inspection reveals that it may no longer serve the required function due to damage or wear, because the required inspection interval has been exceeded, because it does not meet the criteria of this standard, or because it has been used to arrest a fall.

To learn more about the specifics of this ANSI Standard, click here.

OSHA Inspection Standards

OSHA Standards 29 CFR, Part 1910 Subpart F specifically address inspection requirements.

“Inspections.” Personal fall arrest systems shall be inspected prior to use for mildew, wear, damage and other deterioration, and defective components shall be removed from service if their strength or function may be adversely affected. “Inspection Considerations.” As stated in the standard (section I, Paragraph (f)), personal fall arrest systems must be regularly inspected for the following:

  • Any significant defect (tears, cuts, abrasions, mold, undue stretching)
  • Alterations or additions which might affect its efficiency
  • Damage due to deterioration
  • Contact with fire, acids, or other corrosives
  • Distorted hooks or faulty hook springs
  • Tongues unfitted to the shoulder of buckles
  • Loose or damaged mountings
  • Non-functioning parts
  • Wearing or internal deterioration in the ropes

Any component showing the signs above, should be withdrawn from service immediately, and should be tagged or marked as unusable or destroyed.

Further information on the OSHA Standards can be found by clicking here.

Fall Protection Systems Inspection Services

FPS now offers fall protection inspection services. Regardless of make or manufacturer our fall protection specialists will come to your work site to inspect your current system for compliance, damage or defect. More information on the program can be found here.

To schedule your inspection, please fill out this form.

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