Know at least two ways out of every room, if possible. Make sure all doors and windows leading outside open easily.

If a Fire Starts in Your Home, Are You Prepared?

Remember, having an escape plan is the first step to fire safety and being prepared in the event of an emergency.

You undoubtedly hear on the news about house and apartment fires but may think it could never happen to you or your family. According to a recent National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) survey, only one in four Americans have actually developed and practiced a home fire escape plan. Did you know that in 30 seconds, a small flame can get out of control and turn into a major fire, leaving family members in the upper levels of multi-story homes trapped.

To know if you are truly prepared to escape from a fire in your home, there are a few questions you can ask yourself:

1. Does your family have a fire escape plan?
2. Have you drawn a map of your home showing all windows and doors?
3. Have you practiced your fire escape plan during the day and at night?
4. Do you have a sticker on your door identifying how many people and pets reside in your dwelling?
5. If you live in a multi-level home, do you own a fire escape ladder?
6. Have you tested your fire escape ladder in a fire drill?

If you answered no to any of these questions, then your plan is not complete. Remember, having a plan is the first step to fire safety and being prepared in the event of an emergency.

As October is Fire Prevention Month, below is a summary of critical fire safety and escape tips to help you be prepared, courtesy of NFPA:

  • Know at least two ways out of every room, if possible. Make sure all doors and windows leading outside open easily.
  • Have an outside meeting place a safe distance from the home where everyone should meet.
  • Practice your home fire drill at night and during the day with everyone in your home, twice a year.
  • Practice using different ways out.
  • Teach children how to escape on their own in case you can't help them.
  • Close doors behind you as you leave.

One important option to help your family feel confident they can escape a fire, should it strike, is having an escape ladder solution in place.

About the Author

Chris Filardi is vice president of marketing for Werner Co. With more than 25 years of marketing and product development experience in the industrial/professional segment, he leads Werner Co.'s marketing team. He started with Werner Co. in 1999 and currently spearheads all of Werner Co.'s marketing initiatives, with a focus on driving sales through promotions, advertising, brand development, new product launches, merchandising, online, and public relations. He holds a bachelor's degree in advertising from Penn State University. A fully integrated manufacturer and distributor, Werner Co. is a leading provider of climbing equipment in the United States.

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