OSHA Burns Carpet Maker with $53,000 in Fines

"This inspection has identified violations that involve possible amputations by unguarded equipment and electrical shock dangers," said Andre Richards, director of OSHA's Atlanta-West Area Office.

OSHA has cited Nance Carpet and Rug Co. Inc. with 10 serious violations for exposing workers to amputation and electrical shock hazards at the company's Calhoun, Ga., facility. OSHA's inspection, initiated in November 2011 upon receipt of a complaint, was conducted as part of the agency's National Emphasis Program on Amputations and its Local Emphasis Program on Powered Industrial Trucks. Proposed penalties total $53,000.

The violations involve failing to develop and use lockout/tagout procedures to control the energy sources of equipment; remove a forklift with an inoperable horn from service; protect workers from electrocution hazards; and provide guards on blades, cutting heads, sprocket wheels, chains, shafts, belts, and pulleys.

"This inspection has identified violations that involve possible amputations by unguarded equipment and electrical shock dangers," said Andre Richards, director of OSHA's Atlanta-West Area Office. "Employers cannot wait for an OSHA inspection to identify hazards that are exposing their employees to serious injuries. It is good business to implement preventive programs and systems that ensure such hazards are identified and corrected as part of day-to-day operations."

Nance Carpet and Rug, which employs about 55 workers at its Calhoun facility, manufactures area rugs and remnants for residential and commercial purposes.

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