FDA Launches Website on Proper Disposal of Sharps

After being used, many sharps end up in home and public trash cans or flushed down toilets. This kind of improper disposal puts people, such as sanitation workers, sewage treatment workers, and janitors at risk for needlestick injuries or infection with viruses.

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration yesterday launched a new website for patients and caregivers on the safe disposal of needles and other so-called “sharps” that are used at home, at work, and while traveling.

The website is geared to help people understand the public health risks created by improperly disposing of used sharps and how users should safely dispose of them.

Sharps is a term for medical devices with sharp points or edges that can puncture or cut the skin. Such medical devices include hypodermic needles and syringes used to administer medication, lancets or fingerstick devices to collect blood for testing, needle and tubing systems for infusing intravenous and subcutaneous medicines, and connection needles used for home hemodialysis.

After being used, many sharps end up in home and public trash cans or flushed down toilets. This kind of improper disposal puts people, such as sanitation workers, sewage treatment workers, janitors, housekeepers, family members, and children at risk for needlestick injuries or infection with viruses such as Hepatitis B and C and Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV).

“Safe disposal of used needles and other sharps is a public health priority,” said Jeffrey Shuren, M.D., director of the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health. “This website provides information about how to keep used sharps from ending up in places where they could harm people.”

With more diseases and conditions such as diabetes, cancer, allergies, arthritis, and HIV being managed outside of hospitals and doctors’ offices, the number of sharps used in homes and work offices is increasing. In addition, pets are being treated in homes and livestock are being treated on farms, which are also contributing to the increased number of sharps outside of veterinary hospitals.

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency estimates that more than three billion needles and other sharps are used in homes in the United States each year.

Sharps disposal guidelines and programs vary by jurisdiction. For example, in 2008, California passed legislation banning throwing needles in household trash. Florida, New Jersey, and New York have established community drop off programs at hospitals and other health care facilities. People using sharps at home or work or while traveling should check with their local trash removal services or health department to find out about disposal methods available in their area.

For the safe disposal of needles and other sharps used outside of the health care setting, FDA recommends the following:

Do:

  • Immediately place used sharps in an FDA-cleared sharps disposal container to reduce the risk of needle-sticks, cuts, or punctures from loose sharps. (A list of products and companies with FDA-cleared sharps disposal containers is available on FDA’s website.)
  • If an FDA-cleared container is not available, some associations and community guidelines recommend using a heavy-duty plastic household container as an alternative. The container should be leak-resistant, remain upright during use, and have a tight fitting, puncture-resistant lid, such as a plastic laundry detergent container.
  • Keep sharps and sharps disposal containers out of reach of children and pets.
  • Call your local trash or public health department to find out about sharps disposal programs in your area.

Do Not:

  • Throw loose sharps into the trash.
  • Flush sharps down the toilet.
  • Put sharps in a recycling bin; they are not recyclable.
  • Try to remove, bend, break, or recap sharps used by another person.
  • Attempt to remove a needle without a needle clipper device.
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OH&S Digital Edition

  • OHS Magazine Digital Edition - July August 2019

    July/August 2019

    Featuring:

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    • PROTECTIVE APPAREL
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