Electrical Wire Splices Recalled Due to Shock, Fire Hazards

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission, in cooperation with Molex, of Lisle, Ill., have announced a voluntary recall of approximately 53,000 electrical wire splices (also known as Butt Splice Connectors).

The recalled butt splices can fail to hold the wires adequately together, posing a shock and fire hazard to consumers. The splices are used to connect electrical wires to one another and are typically used for wiring small electrical appliances, like audio equipment, or in automotive applications.

The splices are yellow insulated vinyl and measure about one inch long and ¼ inch wide. They were intended for use with 12-10 AWG wire. 12-10 is stamped on the side of the splices. Model numbers 10-126, or 21-126, and Gardner Bender are printed on the product's packaging.

The splices were manufactured in the United States and sold in packages of eight or 50 at electrical distributors, hardware stores, and home centers nationwide from June 2005 through April 2008 for between $1 and $5.

Gardner Bender has received one report of a recalled butt splice failing to hold wires together. No injuries have been reported. Consumers should immediately stop using products that contain the recalled butt splices and contact the manufacturer for free replacement splices at 800-624-4320 between 8 a.m. and 5 p.m. CT Monday through Friday, or visit www.gardnerbender.com.

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