May 2018 OH&S

May 2018

  • RESPIRATORY PROTECTION: Don't Get Left in the Dust
  • EMERGENCY SHOWERS & EYEWASH: Creating a 'Comfort Zone' for Emergency Equipment Water Temperature
  • INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE: The Industrial Hygienist's Guide to Anticipate, Evaluate, and Manage Occupational Health & Safety Risks with Industrial Hygiene Software
  • INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE: Tips for Creating a More Successful Industrial Hygiene Program
  • HEARING PROTECTION: NIOSH, OSHA Release Guidance on Ototoxicity
  • AIHCE 2018 PREVIEW: All In for Philadelphia
  • COMBUSTIBLE DUST: Handling Combustible Dusts
  • COMBUSTIBLE DUST: Think You Don't Have Combustible Dust in Your Facility? Think Again!
  • DISASTER PREPAREDNESS: The Best Defense is a Good Offense: Preparing for Natural Disasters
  • DISASTER PREPAREDNESS: Recovering Assets After a Disaster
  • EMERGENCY RESPONSE TRAINING: Everyone is an Emergency Responder
  • EMERGENCY RESPONSE TRAINING: Hands-on, Scenario-based Training for Emergency Responders and Rescuers
  • CHEMICAL SAFETY/SDS: The Disharmony of SDS Management: The Real Business Impact
  • CHEMICAL SAFETY/SDS: A Holistic Approach to On-Site Chemical Management
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Cover Story

Dust collection systems include a shroud that surrounds the drill bit and connects to a hose leading to a dust canister, where collected dust is stored. (E-Z Drill photo)

Don't Get Left in the Dust

By Rick Walstad

Here's how to easily and successfully meet OSHA standards with your concrete drill.


Features

With removable, interchangeable, and adjustable components that allow for a variety of scenario-based trainings, the center offers numerous courses related to technical rescue, hazardous materials, and emergency response.

Hands-on, Scenario-based Training for Emergency Responders and Rescuers

By Deborah Lovell

The key to mitigating human error during a real emergency is the right kind of realistic training.


Organizations with a strong disaster response plan are well suited to combat the destruction of a natural disaster and recover faster.

The Best Defense is a Good Offense: Preparing for Natural Disasters

By Carol Hill

Not all natural disasters occur during full staff hours. Many take place when staff or logistical support is limited. Keep this in mind while creating the plan.


This CSB photo shows the aftermath of the Imperial Sugar plant explosions in 2008 and is found in the U.S. Chemical Safety and Hazard Investigation Board

Handling Combustible Dusts

By David Kennedy

The biggest mistake food manufacturers make is assuming that because their plants have been in operation for years without accidents and without being cited, they are in compliance.


This Nov. 27, 2017, photo from Ramrod Key, Fla., shows contractors using heavy equipment and trucks to haul debris from a highway after Hurricane Irma. (Howard Greenblatt/FEMA photo)

Recovering Assets After a Disaster

By Karen D. Hamel

One or all of a facility's assets may be compromised or destroyed. Documenting what resources will be available to guard or replace those assets facilitates a timely recovery.


Wholesale adoption of GHS hazard classsification principles will disrupt chemical hazard assessment programs and heighten problems manufacturers and importers will face.

A Holistic Approach to On-Site Chemical Management

By Ian Cohen

Technology can help streamline and standardize complex processes, centralize data and corresponding analyses, make reporting easier, and eliminate silos between departments.


Every employee who may witness or discover a hazardous substance release and who is responsible for alerting others or evacuating must complete first responder HAZWOPER awareness training. (Ben Carlson/Shutterstock.com)

Everyone is an Emergency Responder

By Roger Marks

If employees take the wrong response actions, don’t know what to do, or try to perform jobs they are not capable of, the resulting mistakes, confusion, and disarray will stand in the way of a safe response.


The May 22 general session will bring all attendees together for a discussion on one of the most pressing issues in America, the opioids crisis and the potential for first responders to be dangerously exposed while working. (J. Smith for Visit Philadelphia photo)

All In for Philadelphia

By Jessica Davis

The May 22 general session will bring all attendees together for a discussion on one of the most pressing issues in America, the opioids crisis and the potential for first responders to be dangerously exposed while working.


By June 1, 2016, OSHA expects all employers to be fully compliant with GHS adoption.

The Disharmony of SDS Management: The Real Business Impact

By David Williams

The Globally Harmonized System for Classification and Labeling of Chemicals isn't actually that harmonized. This disharmony creates bigger challenges to managing SDSs and chemical data across the global supply chain.


It

The Industrial Hygienist's Guide to Anticipate, Evaluate, and Manage Occupational Health & Safety Risks with Industrial Hygiene Software

By Ma Joelle Lingat

Effective industrial hygiene management requires recording and maintaining consistent and complete work site data. Using outdated methods is in itself a serious risk.


Tips for Creating a More Successful Industrial Hygiene Program

By Zoë Frances

With the right strategies and tools, you’ll overcome the challenges and create an industrial hygiene program that protects your most important asset—your employees.


NIOSH, OSHA Release Guidance on Ototoxicity

By Jerry Laws

Some ototoxic chemicals may exacerbate noise-induced hearing loss even though the noise level is below OSHA’s PEL, the document warns.


This CSB photo shows the aftermatch of the dust explosion and fire on Feb. 20, 2003, at the CTA Acoustics manufacturing plant in Corbin, Ky. killing seven workers.

Think You Don't Have Combustible Dust in Your Facility? Think Again!

By Stephen Watkins

The bottom line is this: If your facility contains dust, you should have it tested for combustibility.


Departments

ASSE Developing Active Shooter Technical Report

By Jerry Laws

The reason to create a technical report is that workplace safety standards can take years to develop.


Energizing to Power Sparkling Engagement

By Robert Pater

"Energizing" is potentially highly renewable. We've seen how people become immediately charged up when they discover how select Safety techniques can make them immediately stronger and more balanced.