Oregon OSHA Cites Lumber Company for Six Violations

Mid-Columbia Lumber Products is being cited for violating job safety rules by Oregon OSHA in connection with an accident investigation.

Oregon OSHA cited Mid-Columbia Lumber Productions for six violations of job safety rules in connection with an accident investigation of the company’s worksite in Madras. Half of the six violations are repeat offenses.

Mid-Columbia Lumber Productions, which manufacturers framing lumber, has one violation for exposing workers to serious harm or death by not controlling the hazards involved in maintaining a powered machine—an outfeed conveyor. In another citation, the company subjected workers to the dangers of getting caught in an unguarded rotating sprocket.

Another violation regarding hazardous energy noted the company’s failure to use lock out and tag out procedures to isolate a machine from its power source. This violation is the second such violation committed by the company since 2016. Likewise, the unguarded machine violation was a repeat of the company’s carelessness in 2017.

“There is simply no reason to expose workers to hazards that we have long known how to control or eliminate,” said Michael Wood, administrator for Oregon OSHA. “To repeatedly violate safety standards—standards that exist to protect people from harm—is the height of recklessness.”

Oregon OSHA opened the investigation of Mid-Columbia Lumber Products in September 2019 after an accident where a worker attempted to put a moving chain back on the track of a moulder outfeed chain conveyor while it was still operating. The worker’s hand was dragged into the machine’s rotating sprocket. The worker’s injuries resulted in an amputated ring finger, an amputated pinky fingertip, and pins installed in the crushed middle and pointer fingers.

Under Oregon OSHA rules, penalties multiply when you employers commit repeat violations. Mid-Columbia Lumber Products has a proposed penalty of $8,610.

The company’s six violations are the following:

  • Failing to maintain an effective centralized safety committee, which employers with multiple locations may use. This serious violation included not having a written safety and health policy; not posting safety committee minutes; not training committee members on hazard identification; and not conducting quarterly inspections.
  • Failing to conduct periodic inspections to ensure energy control procedures were being followed. This was a serious violation.
  • Failing to develop, document, and use procedures to control potentially hazardous energy when employees are doing service or maintenance work on a powered machine. This was as repeat violation.
  • Failing to provide machine guarding to protect employees from hazards created by point of operation, nip points, rotating parts, flying chips, and sparks. This was a repeat violation.
  • Failing to train employees in the safe application, use, and removal of energy control devices. This was a repeat violation.
  • Failing to maintain and produce documents related to recording workplace injuries and illnesses. This was an other-than-serious violation.

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