Army Corps of Engineers Stresses Water Safety

The public's help is needed to reduce the number of fatalities at the more than 2,800 USACE-managed recreation areas nationwide, according to USACE's eve-of-summer reminder.

With millions of Americans planning visits to lakes and rivers this summer, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is reminding them to be aware of the importance of practicing safe, sensible activities in and around the water. "Tragically, several people lose their lives while visiting USACE lands and waters every year," the agency's news release said. "The majority of the tragedies are water-related. The public's help is needed to reduce the number of fatalities at the more than 2,800 USACE-managed recreation areas nationwide. USACE personnel stress the importance of water safety year-round when talking with visitors, but especially during the summer season because that is when most public recreation fatalities occur."

It asks that visitors keep five things in mind before entering or being around the water:

  • Expect the unexpected. If you are ejected from a boat, fall, or jump into water that is colder than 70 degrees, you can inhale water from involuntary gasping, hyperventilation, panic, and sometimes vertigo that can cause you to drown. You can also be knocked unconscious if you are ejected from your boat or fall into the water along the shoreline while fishing.
  • Wear a life jacket. By providing time to be rescued, it will help ensure you survive an unexpected fall into the water. It can also save your life if you become exhausted due to fatigue, waves, or current while swimming. An adult can drown in 60 seconds, and it takes a strong swimmer 10 minutes to put on a life jacket after entering the water. Life Jackets Worn…Nobody Mourns.
  • Know your swimming abilities. Be aware that swimming in natural waters such as a lake, river, or pond is different from swimming in a pool, and your swimming ability decreases with age. It is never too late to take swimming lessons and learn to swim well. Several people every year drown swimming to retrieve boats and toys. Let those go, because they are not worth losing your life over.Alcohol and water are a deadly combination. Alcohol induces an inner ear condition (caloric labyrinthitis) that can cause you to become disoriented when underwater and not realize which way is up. If you jump or fall in the water, you can become disoriented and swim down instead of up to safety, causing you to drown. This can more likely happen if you have been consuming alcohol.
  • Understand "boater's hypnosis." It is a condition brought on by the effects of sun, wind, noise, vibration, and motion experienced during a day of boating. Boater's hypnosis can slow your reaction time almost as much as if you were legally intoxicated. Adding alcohol to this condition intensifies the effects.

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