Canada to Study Health Impact of Wind Turbine Noise

The proposed study by Health Canada, Statistics Canada, and outside experts would involve 2,000 residences and between eight and 12 turbines.

Public comments will be accepted until Sept. 7 about a research study Health Canada has proposed involving the relationship between wind turbine noise and health effects experienced by people living near them. Done in collaboration with Statistics Canada and outside experts specializing in noise, health assessment, clinical medicine, and epidemiology, the study would involve 2,000 residences and between eight and 12 wind turbines.

Interviews, health assessments of the study population, and noise measurements will be completed. The fine results will be published in 2014 in peer-reviewed literature, according to the agency.

Health Canada announced it July 10 and said it would take comments for 30 days, then extended the comment period about a week later. "This study is in response to questions from residents living near wind farms about possible health effects of low-frequency noise generated by wind turbines," said Leona Aglukkaq, Canada's minister of Health. "As always, our government is putting the health and safety of Canadians first, and this study will do just that by painting a more complete picture of the potential health impacts of wind turbine noise."

Health Canada reported it is aware of health-related complaints from some people living in close proximity to wind turbines.

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