Texas Shipbuilder's LOTO, Repeat Hazards Carry $150,700 Fine

Some of the serious violations include failing to repair a defective hook latch on a crane, ensure the appropriate use of lockout equipment for energy sources, and provide training on confined spaces.

OSHA has cited Sneed Shipbuilding Inc. for 14 serious, seven repeat, and four other-than-serious violations for exposing workers to multiple safety hazards at the company's facility in Channelview, Texas. Proposed penalties total $150,700.

OSHA's Houston North Area Office began its investigation on June 7 at the shipyard where workers perform electrical, plumbing, welding, and maintenance work.

Some of the serious violations include failing to repair a defective hook latch on a crane, ensure the appropriate use of lockout equipment for energy sources, provide training on confined spaces, repair damaged welding cables, and provide the required fall protection for employees working on scaffolds.

Repeat violations include failing to conduct crane inspections on a periodic basis, properly maintain flexible cords and cables, repair damaged electrical outlets and welding cables, and provide fire extinguishers. Similar violations were cited in June 2010.

The other-than-serious violations involve failing to provide the required testing in confined spaces for safe atmospheric conditions and failing to provide lavatory hand soap.

"This company has once again put the safety of its workers at risk by not adhering to OSHA standards," said David Doucet, director of OSHA's Houston North Area Office. "Employers will be held accountable for repeatedly jeopardizing the safety of employees."

Sneed Shipbuilding employs approximately 150 workers.

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  • OHS Magazine Digital Edition - June 2019

    June 2019

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