Younger Women Often Miss Warning Signs of Heart Attack

Most women 55 or younger don't recognize warning signs of a heart attack, according to a study reported in Washington, D.C., last week during the American Heart Association’s 8th Scientific Forum on Quality of Care and Outcomes Research in Cardiovascular Disease and Stroke. While this group represents only a small percentage of all hospitalized heart disease patients, it is still significant at more than 40,000 hospitalizations nationwide annually, and heart diseases are among the leading causes of death for its members.

"The number of young women who die from coronary heart disease each year is roughly comparable to the number of women who die of breast cancer in this age group," Judith Lichtman, Ph.D., lead author of the study, said in a report on the findings that is posted on AHA's Web site, www.americanheart.org. "Studies have shown that young women with heart disease are twice as likely to die in the hospital as similarly aged men. While these statistics are startling, relatively little is known about the clinical presentation, care, or outcomes of young women with heart disease."

The pilot study involved 24 women who were admitted to two Connecticut hospitals after having a heart attack. Nearly 90 percent of them had the typical pre-attack symptom of chest pain, and most said it was significant pain, but just 42 percent of them came to a hospital because they thought something was wrong with their heart. "Many of them told us that they thought they had indigestion or heartburn," Lichtman said. The researchers found about 88 percent of the women had a family history of heart disease and 71 percent said their health was fair/poor, yet under half considered themselves at risk for heart disease.

Download Center

  • Safety Metrics Guide

    Is your company leveraging its safety data and analytics to maintain a safe workplace? With so much data available, where do you start? This downloadable guide will give you insight on helpful key performance indicators (KPIs) you should track for your safety program.

  • Job Hazard Analysis Guide

    This guide includes details on how to conduct a thorough Job Hazard Analysis, and it's based directly on an OSHA publication for conducting JHAs. Learn how to identify potential hazards associated with each task of a job and set controls to mitigate hazard risks.

  • A Guide to Practicing “New Safety”

    Learn from safety professionals from around the world as they share their perspectives on various “new views” of safety, including Safety Differently, Safety-II, No Safety, Human and Organizational Performance (HOP), Resilience Engineering, and more in this helpful guide.

  • Lone Worker Safety Guide

    As organizations digitalize and remote operations become more commonplace, the number of lone workers is on the rise. These employees are at increased risk for unaddressed workplace accidents or emergencies. This guide was created to help employers better understand common lone worker risks and solutions for lone worker risk mitigation and incident prevention.

  • EHS Software Buyer's Guide

    Learn the keys to staying organized, staying sharp, and staying one step ahead on all things safety. This buyer’s guide is designed for you to use in your search for the safety management solution that best suits your company’s needs.

  • Vector Solutions

Featured Whitepaper

OH&S Digital Edition

  • OHS Magazine Digital Edition - May 2022

    May 2022

    Featuring:

    • WEARABLE TECHNOLOGY
      How Wearable Technology is Transforming Safety and the Industrial Workplace
    • TRAINING: CONFINED SPACES
      Five Tips to Improve Safety in Confined Spaces
    • INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE
      Monitor for Asbestos to Help Save Lives
    • PPE: FALL PROTECTION
      Fall Protection Can Be Surprising
    View This Issue