Tyson Foods, Inc.

Tyson Recalls Ready-to-Eat Chicken Strips

The company announced March 21 that approximately 69,093 pounds of frozen, read-to-eat chicken strips from a single plant are being recalled after two consumers reported they found metal fragments in the products.

Tyson Foods Inc. announced March 21 that is voluntarily recalling approximately 69,093 pounds of frozen, read-to-eat chicken strips from a single plant after two consumers reported they found metal fragments in the products.

The total being recalled includes 65,313 pounds of Tyson® Fully Cooked Buffalo Style Chicken Strips and Fully Cooked Crispy Chicken Strips sold to retailers in 25-ounce bags, and 3,780 pounds of Spare Time® branded Fully Cooked Buffalo Style Chicken Strips sold to retailers and correctional institutions in 20-pound boxes.

Even though the two consumer reports involved only two packages, "out of an abundance of caution," the company said, it is recalling the products. Tyson Foods reported it has received no reports of injuries or illnesses associated with the affected product.

The products were produced at one plant location on Nov. 30, 2018. Each package bears the establishment code P7221 and a "use by" date of November 30, 2019. The products were sent to distribution centers in these states: Arkansas, Arizona, California, Connecticut, Georgia, Iowa, Idaho, Illinois, Indiana, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, New York, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Texas, Virginia, West Virginia, Washington, and Wisconsin.

Consumers who have purchased any of the affected items should cut the UPC and date code from the packaging, discard the product, and call 1-866-886-8456. The company reported that a comprehensive list of retail stores that subsequently received the product will eventually be posted on USDA's website, and the retail distribution list will be available at http://www.fsis.usda.gov/FSIS_Recalls/Open_Federal_Cases/index.asp.

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