HIOSH Reminds Workers and Public about Hurricane Hazards

"Recovery work should not put you in the recovery room," DLIR Director Leonard Hoshijo said. "Storm recovery work involves a wide range of safety and health hazards, which can be minimized by knowledge, safe work practices and personal protective equipment."

The Hawaii State Department of Labor & Industrial Relations' Occupational Safety and Health Division (HIOSH) has issued a reminder to recovery workers and residents to be aware of potential hazards that storm conditions and storm impacts might create or raise.

"Recovery work should not put you in the recovery room," DLIR Director Leonard Hoshijo said. "Storm recovery work involves a wide range of safety and health hazards, which can be minimized by knowledge, safe work practices and personal protective equipment. HIOSH wants to make certain that no casualties result from cleanup operations. We are especially concerned in light of the increase in industrial accidents this year, that recovery efforts not lead to injuries or fatalities as Hawaii recovers from Hurricane Lane.”

Cleanup work can involve a variety of activities, including demolition, removal of floodwater from structures, cleaning up debris, use of cranes and other heavy equipment, emergency response activities, and hazardous waste operations.

Inherent hazards related to hurricane recovery work can include illness from exposure to contaminated water or food, exposure to the elements and heat stress, downed electrical wires, carbon monoxide and electrical hazards from portable generators, fall and "struck-by" hazards from tree trimming or working at heights, being caught in unprotected excavations or confined spaces, burns, lacerations, musculoskeletal injuries, being struck by traffic or heavy equipment, and drowning from being caught in moving water or while removing water from flooded structures.

Recovery workers and residents should take protective measures, including evaluating the work area for hazards, task-specific hazard exposure monitoring, using engineering or work practice to controls to mitigate hazards, using personal protective equipment, following appropriate hygiene procedures, assuming all power lines are live, using appropriate precautions for traffic work zones, and using all equipment correctly.

Download Center

HTML - No Current Item Deck
  • Safety Management Software - Free Demo

    IndustrySafe Safety Software’s comprehensive suite of modules help organizations to record and manage incidents, inspections, hazards, behavior based safety observations, and much more. Improve safety with an easy to use tool for tracking, notifying and reporting on key safety data.

  • Create Flexible Safety Dashboards

    IndustrySafe’s Dashboard Module allows organizations allows you to easily create and view safety KPIs to help you make informed business decisions. Our best of breed default indicators can also save you valuable time and effort in monitoring safety metrics.

  • Schedule and Record Observations

    IndustrySafe's Observations module allows managers, supervisors, and employees to conduct observations on employees involved in safety critical behavior. IndustrySafe’s pre-built BBS checklists may be used as is, or can be customized to better suit the needs of your organization.

  • Why Is Near Miss Reporting Important?

    A near miss is an accident that's waiting to happen. Learn how to investigate these close calls and prevent more serious incidents from occurring in the future.

  • Get the Ultimate Guide to Safety Training

    When it comes to safety training, no matter the industry, there are always questions regarding requirements and certifications. We’ve put together a guide on key safety training topics, requirements for certifications, and answers to common FAQs.

  • Industry Safe
comments powered by Disqus

OH&S Digital Edition

  • OHS Magazine Digital Edition - May 2019

    May 2019

    Featuring:

    • RESPIRATORY PROTECTION
      Why Pick a PAPR? 
    • FIRE SAFETY TRAINING
      Fire Safety: Plan, Prevent, Train, Recover
    • PROTECTIVE APPAREL
      The Truth About Heat Stress and FRC
    • AIHCE EXP 2019 PREVIEW
      Underestimated No More
    View This Issue