The 4-Letter Word That Should Guide Your Safety Efforts

That word is OSHA. (Yes, technically, it’s an acronym, but stick with me here.)

That word is OSHA. (Yes, technically, it’s an acronym, but stick with me here.)

According to the Occupational Safety & Health Administration (OSHA), “Slips, trips, and falls constitute the majority of general industry accidents. They cause 15% of all accidental deaths, and are second only to motor vehicles as a cause of fatalities.”

In fact, OSHA guidelines state their point pretty clearly: “Employers have the responsibility to provide a safe workplace. Employers MUST provide their employees with a workplace that does not have serious hazards and follow all relevant OSHA safety and health standards.”

Now, slips and falls aren’t specifically regulated by OSHA, due to the countless variables they would have to consider – type of walking surface, type of slippery contaminant, slope of the surface, and even the gait of any given individual, not to mention the countless scenarios when all of these variables mix and match in a dangerous soup.

So while OSHA may not be breathing down your neck when it comes specifically to slips and falls, responsible companies will not wait for a hazard to be regulated to take precautions.

Why? Two words: Cost and danger.

The cost of doing nothing far outweighs the cost of a well-run safety program. And it presents a danger to employee wellbeing, your company’s reputation, your safety record and your bottom line.

We have a hazard on the horizon. It’s unpredictable. It’s prolonged. It’s lethal. And it happens every year. It’s called winter. And if you work where there’s snow and ice, you run the risk of winter slips and falls bringing your company to a grinding halt.

Now is the time to research and purchase traction aids and ice cleats, before this inevitable hazard, unlike OSHA, is breathing down your neck.

We’re here to help you research when you’re ready.

Download Center

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  • EHS Software Buyer's Guide

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OH&S Digital Edition

  • OHS Magazine Digital Edition - June 2022

    June 2022

    Featuring:

    • SAFETY CULTURE
      Corporate Safety Culture Is Workplace Culture
    • HEAT STRESS
      Keeping Workers Safe from Heat-Related Illnesses & Injuries
    • EMPLOYEE HEALTH SCREENING
      Should Employers Consider Oral Fluid Drug Testing?
    • PPE FOR WOMEN
      Addressing Physical Differences
    View This Issue