Pennnsylvania Manufacturer in OSHA's Crosshairs Again

"William Lloyd and Lloyd Industries are serial violators of OSHA safety standards, and their workers have paid the price," Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Dr. David Michaels said May 11. "For 15 years, they have repeatedly put their employees at risk of serious injuries. This must stop now."

OSHA announced May 11 that it has added 10 new willful violations to Montgomeryville, Pa.-based Lloyd Industries Inc.'s ledger, based on what OSHA described as the company's repeated failure to guard machines and to provide annual audiometric tests, along with three willful, four serious, and seven other-than-serious violations for electrical hazards, noise protection, and recordkeeping violations. Lloyd Industries Inc. manufacturers ventilation, duct, and fire safety products and has been an OSHA enforcement target for several years.

"Since 2000, Lloyd has shown a pattern of defiance toward OSHA safety standards. In one instance, OSHA officials were forced to summon U.S. federal marshals to gain entrance when Lloyd refused to admit them, even after they obtained a warrant. Despite numerous federal inspections, warnings, fines and promises to stop putting workers at risk, the company’s repeated failure to keep its employees safe has resulted in approximately 40 serious injuries since 2000. These injuries include serious lacerations as well as crushed, fractured, dislocated and amputated fingers," the agency's news release stated.

Following inspection in July 2014, initiated after a worker lost three fingers on his right hand in a press brake machine, OSHA issued $822,000 in fines against Lloyd Industries, bringing its total OSHA fines to more than $1 million since 2000, and placed the company in its Severe Violator Enforcement Program.

"William Lloyd and Lloyd Industries are serial violators of OSHA safety standards, and their workers have paid the price," Assistant Secretary of Labor for Occupational Safety and Health Dr. David Michaels said May 11. "No employer is above the law. For 15 years, they have repeatedly put their employees at risk of serious injuries. This must stop now."

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OH&S Digital Edition

  • OHS Magazine Digital Edition - January 2019

    January 2019

    Featuring:

    • PREVENTING ERRORS
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    • EMERGENCY SHOWERS & EYEWASH
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    • CONSTRUCTION SAFETY
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