Nearly 70 Percent of Prescription Painkiller Users Don't Know Sharing is a Felony

An NSC poll found this to be true even though sharing narcotic opioid painkillers is the equivalent to selling heroin in most states

The NSC has release a public opinion poll showing nearly 70 percent of those who take opioid prescription painkillers do not believe sharing the medication is a felony. Most states consider sharing narcotic opioid painkillers, such as hydrocodone or oxycodone, to be the legal equivalent of selling heroin.

“Forty-five people die every day from overdosing on prescription painkillers,” said Deborah A.P. Hersman, president and CEO of the National Safety Council. “These medications are federally controlled substances and gateway drugs to heroin. Sharing drugs is never worth the risk, especially when non-addictive, over-the-counter pain relievers are often better options.”

Other findings include: nine in 10 opioid painkiller users are not concerned about addiction as a side effect, even though 60 percent of users have at least one addiction risk factor; 60 percent of opioid painkiller users feel opioids are the most effective medications to treat pain; Americans mistakenly believe gun violence, severe weather and commercial airline travel are more significant threats to their safety than opioid painkillers; and many Americans do not realize they have taken opioids.

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  • OHS Magazine Digital Edition - September 2020

    September 2020

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