How to Select the Right Puncture-Resistant Glove

Do you know what kind of puncture-resistant glove you need? Are you choosing the right kind according to safety and industry standards?

One thing to remember is this: there is no such thing as puncture PROOF when it comes to gloves, which is why the term ‘resistant’ is used instead.

The type of material used to create a high level of puncture resistance means that dexterity is affected, since a much stiffer layer of impenetrable material is added in order to be truly effective against puncture and slash hazards. Nonetheless, the remarkable thing about the several styles we have developed at Superior Glove is that while our puncture-resistant gloves utilize materials like steel mesh, we use the finest, highest quality available so that we don’t impede comfort.

There are a few things to consider when selecting puncture-resistant work gloves…

1. Choose the Right Puncture Standard

Large object puncture threat: EN 388:1994
Fine object puncture threat: ASTM 1342 modified standard

If you are dealing with larger objects that pose a puncture threat (lumber industry, metal fabrication, waste collection) you should choose a glove that has been tested according to EN 388:1994 puncture standard, which uses a relatively large needle probe.

If you are dealing with fine sharp objects such as medical needles, you need to ignore the EN 388:1994 puncture standard and instead select a glove that has been tested according to ASTM 1342 modified standard (.25 gauge medical needle). The images below should make it pretty clear why the EN 388 and ASTM 1342 (modified) puncture standards should be applied differently.

2. Palm or Full Coverage?

Most puncture gloves only protect the palm area of the hand, which is okay for many applications — just be sure you are aware of this and that workers don’t have a false sense of invincibility with these gloves. Full-coverage puncture gloves are also available (check out ours) but the tradeoff is they tend to be higher in price and comfort and dexterity becomes slightly diminished.

3. Consider Industry Specific Factors

What other features do you need in your gloves that are specific to your Industry?

Industry: Common Glove Features Required (in addition to Puncture)
Waste Collection: Liquid Resistance, Good Grip
Lumber: High Abrasion Resistance
Steel: Cut Resistance
Oil and Gas: Cut Resistance

4. Don’t Forget Comfort

Once you’ve figured out the right puncture standard, ensure you have the most comfortable glove possible (and remember that comfort is a relative term when talking about puncture gloves). No amount of cajoling or incentives will get your team to wear uncomfortable gloves.

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OH&S Digital Edition

  • OHS Magazine Digital Edition - January 2019

    January / February 2019

    Featuring:

    • PREVENTING ERRORS
      Production vs. Safety 
    • EMERGENCY SHOWERS & EYEWASH
      Meeting the Requirements for Emergency Equipment
    • CONSTRUCTION SAFETY
      The State of Contractor Safety
    • FOOT PROTECTION
      The Three Keys to Effective Chemical Management
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