Worker Amputations Lead to $107,200 Fine for Missouri Firm

OSHA initiated an inspection in October 2010 in response to a report of accidents at the facility, one in which an employee lost fingers in machinery and another in which an employee lost a foot in a forklift incident.

Metal Container Corp. in Arnold, Mo., has been cited for one willful and 13 serious violations of federal safety standards set by OSHA. OSHA initiated an inspection in October 2010 in response to a report of accidents at the facility, one in which an employee lost fingers in machinery and another in which an employee lost a foot in a forklift incident. Proposed penalties for the citations total $107,200.

"There is no excuse for employees to be exposed to such hazards. Workers operating and working around machinery must be protected from potential dangers," said Charles Adkins, OSHA's regional administrator in Kansas City, Mo. "It is imperative that employers take the necessary steps to eliminate hazards and provide a safe working environment for all of their employees to avoid serious accidents like these."

The willful citation was issued for hazards associated with unguarded machinery. A willful violation exists when an employer has demonstrated either an intentional disregard for the requirements of the law or plain indifference to employee safety and health.

The serious citations address hazards associated with exits, flammable/combustible materials, personal protective equipment, lockout/tagout of energy sources, forklift use, machine guarding, and electrical deficiencies. A serious violation occurs when there is substantial probability that death or serious physical harm could result from a hazard about which the employer knew or should have known.

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