285,000 Cricket EZ Cell Phones Recalled Due to 911 Audio Issues

Cricket Communications, of San Diego, Calif. (a subsidiary of Leap Wireless International Inc.), in cooperation with the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commision, is voluntarily recalling its "Cricket EZ" cellular phones. The recall involves approximately 285,000 cell phones that have a software issue that causes audio problems with 911 calls. When a call is connected to 911, the operator may not hear the caller or the caller may not hear the 911 operator.

Cricket has received two reports of the audio not working properly when a consumer placed a call to 911. No injuries were reported.

The recalled cell phones are small, black and silver bar-style. "Cricket" is printed on top of the phone above the display panel. Model number "CRKJ88BKIT" is located on a label inside the battery compartment behind the battery. They were manufactured in China and sold by Cricket stores and independent dealers nationwide from February 2008 through March 2008 for about $90.

Not included in this recall are units that have a model number that ends with a "B" ("CRKJ88BKITB"), units that have a green dot on the inside label, and units that were sold after March 2008.

Consumers should immediately return their phone to Cricket for a free software repair. Cricket is directly contacting consumers who purchased these cell phones to alert them to the recall. For additional information, contact Cricket toll-free at (866) 441-1577 between 6 a.m. and 10:30 p.m. MT Monday through Saturday, and between 7 a.m. and 10:30 a.m. MT on Sunday, or visit www.mycricket.com.

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