ASSE Releases Historical Safety Standards Package on Hoists, Employee Elevators

The American Society of Safety Engineers has released a historical construction and demolition standards package that includes the newly revised ANSI/ASSE A10.4-2007 Standard and all previous ANSI A10.4 standards available for the past 40-plus years. The A10.4 standard, Safety Requirements for Personnel Hoists and Employee Elevators on Construction and Demolition Sites, has been widely used by SH&E professionals since the early 1960s and has historically played a significant role in the prevention of injuries and fatalities on construction and demolition sites, ASSE says.

"The standards package is important especially on the state level as some states still use the older versions," said John Quackenbush, A10.4 subgroup chair, of Sunset Beach, N.C. "The latest A10.4 standard is important because it addresses new technology. It is difficult to create a standard that addresses all safety hazards, but by reviewing accidents on an ongoing basis and staying abreast of new technology, we will continue to improve the A10.4 standard, which makes the construction and demolition industry safer."

Approved by ANSI in early May, ANSI/ASSE A10.7-2007 applies to the design, construction, installation, operation, inspection, testing, maintenance, alterations, and repair of hoists and elevators that are not a vital part of buildings; are installed inside or outside buildings or structures during construction, alteration, demolition or operations; and are used to raise and lower workers and other personnel connected with or related to the structure. These personnel hoists and employee elevators may also be used for transporting materials under specific circumstances defined in this standard. It is part of a series of standards that focus on construction and demolition operations.

ASSE serves as the secretariat for the A10 Accredited Standards Committee on construction and demolition operations. The ANSI/ASSE A10.4-2007 Standards Package, which includes all historical versions of A10.4, is available in electronic format. For more information, contact ASSE customer service at 847-699-2929 or visit www.asse.org.

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