OHS October 2013 cover

October 2013

  • VISION PROTECTION: Tips for Delivering a Comprehensive Safety Eyewear Program
  • FOOD SAFETY: Carrying Out pH Testing in the Food Industry
  • CHEMICAL SAFETY/SDS: Chemical Management on the Go--What's New in Mobile Solutions
  • CHEMICAL SAFETY/SDS: Newest HazCom Chemical Hazard: GHS Classification Shock
  • EMERGENCY SHOWERS & EYEWASH: The 10-Second Race: Better Eyewash Stations Reduce Injury
  • EMERGENCY SHOWERS & EYEWASH: Eyewash Safety: Keeping Water in the Comfort Zone
  • ELECTRICAL SAFETY: Analyzing Electrical Hazards in the Workplace
  • ELECTRICAL SAFETY: Electrical Safety Basics: Not Exactly Shocking
  • SLIP & FALL: How Slip-Resistant Shoes Can Put Money in Your Company's Pocket
  • FIRE SAFETY: Fire Extinguisher Training Best Practices
  • HEALTH & WELLNESS: Taking Hazards From the Home to the Workplace
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Cover Story

When it comes to protecting workers

Tips for Delivering a Comprehensive Safety Eyewear Program

By Daniel Birch, David Iannelli

Every employer should make it a safety priority for its workers to operate with clear vision in their workplace and surroundings.


Features

Hands-on training is by far the most successful way to familiarize one with fire extinguisher usage.

Fire Extinguisher Training: Best Practices

By Ryan O'Donnell

Talking about the best fire extinguisher for each situation is essential in any fire safety training program.


Chemical Management on the Go -- What's New in Mobile Solutions

By Kraig Haberer

It's critical to ensure that key chemical safety information and inventory management functions are readily available and at the fingertips of your personnel.


OSHA 1910.132 (f) – Training (1) says employers must provide training to each employee who is required by this section to use PPE.

Analyzing Electrical Hazards in the Workplace

By Dennis K. Neitzel

It is a common misconception that arc hazards are an effect of only high voltage. The actual arc hazard is based on available energy, not available voltage.


When it comes to working with electricity, stop shooting from the hip. You owe it to your employees.

Electrical Safety Basics: Not Exactly Shocking

By Keith Bilger

Factor in all of the challenges before attempting a project and be ready to go to plan B should your initial plan hit a snag.


Mouthwash and over-the-counter medications can harm workers, who may not be aware of the risks.

Taking Hazards From the Home to the Workplace

By Ismail El-Amouri, Patricia Wynd, Joe Beck

Over-the-counter remedies and prescription drugs may affect the health of your workers and at the same time may carry over into the work environment.


Wholesale adoption of GHS hazard classsification principles will disrupt chemical hazard assessment programs and heighten problems manufacturers and importers will face.

Newest HazCom Chemical Hazard: GHS Classification Shock

By Glenn D. Trout

Employers should be prepared to address new hazards for chemicals, even for chemicals that have been used in the workplace for years.


ANSI requires that a 15-minute flow of tepid water be supplied to emergency equipment and suggests an incoming water temperature between 60 and 100 degrees F.

Eyewash Safety: Keeping Water in the Comfort Zone

By Ryan Pfund

Make sure your equipment delivers ANSI-required tepid water to eye and eye/face washes to encourage a full 15- minute flush.


A combination eyewash and faucet unit places the eyewash station where workers are most likely to turn in the emergency: the sink. The eyewash functions without having to turn on the faucet, so there is never a danger of scalding water on the eyes.

The 10-Second Race: Better Eyewash Stations Reduce Injury

By Imants Stiebris, Steven H. Miller

A key benefit of the dual-function approach is the independent water supply to the eyewash function, so there is never a danger of hot water being delivered for eye-flushing.


This photo shows the SR Max Dover men

How Slip-Resistant Shoes Can Put Money in Your Company's Pocket

By Pat Kubis

Many shoes labeled as "slip resistant" often are not effective enough for chefs, nurses, and other professionals who are exposed to hazardous floors.


The food industry requires pH testing to ensure the products meet safety guidelines.

Carrying Out pH Testing in the Food Industry

By Paul Burnside

While there are a variety of other variables and protocols to be followed to ensure our food supply remains safe, a basic understanding of pH and how it is measured is crucial to food production.


Departments

Is Failing Less a Better Safety Goal than Achieving Success?

By Shawn M. Galloway

Safety is notoriously focused on what not to do with increasing rules and a heavier emphasis on progressive discipline than progressive recognition.


Hours of Service War is Over

By Jerry Laws

"With one small exception, our decision today brings to an end much of the permanent warfare surrounding the HOS rules."


Overcoming 'Soft' Complacency

By Robert Pater

I've seen many companies accomplish a lot and then get stuck in place patting themselves on their own backs.