Many Are Pained at Work

A recent survey conducted by Toluna on behalf of Fellowes Inc. asked full-time employees about their aches and pains while at work. The "Comfort in the Workplace" survey found a majority of respondents experience pain at their desks a few times per week or more frequently, including 74 percent who indicatd they're hurting a few times or more each week.

Nearly 70 percent of survey respondents said they adjust or rearrange their workspace at least once a day to get more comfortable, and 18 percent spend 30 minutes to an hour each day trying to make improvements.

Serious aches and pains can be caused by poor habits in the workplace, yet only 18 percent of respondents indicated they are using ergonomic products at work, and fewer than 30 percent said their employer provides ergonomic products for employees to reduce stress and alleviate pain and give extra support.

Fellowes offers a helpful infographic on its Facebook page and has posted this ergonomics checklist on its website, which is titled "From Head to Toe -- Here You Go":

EYES

  • Sit approximately 20" to 35” from your monitor.
  • Position the top of the monitor screen at or slightly below eye level.
  • Use a document holder placed within an optimal viewing range (in line with your monitor and keyboard tray) to properly position the document upright.
  • Use a glare filter to reduce glare, brightness, and reflection.
  • Add a task light to illuminate documents and avoid shadows.
WRISTS
  • Keep wrists straight in a neutral position.
  • Keep the bottom of the elbow even with the keyboard height, not below.
  • Keep forearms approximately parallel to the floor.
  • Use minimum force while striking keys.
SHOULDERS
  • Keep your shoulders relaxed and in a neutral position as you type.
  • Avoid cradling the phone between your shoulder and ear.
  • Keep elbows close to your sides as you use the keyboard and mouse.
  • Do not overextend your arm to reach the mouse. Keep the mouse as close to the keyboard as possible.
  • Take a moment every so often to roll your shoulders up and back to alleviate tension.

BACKS AND LEGS

  • Adjust your chair so your thighs are parallel to the floor.
  • Sit back in the seat so your lower back is supported firmly by the chair, a backrest, or a lower lumbar support.
  • Place your feet on a footrest to relieve "pull" on the lower back.
  • Make sure to get up and stretch every hour.

Posted by Jerry Laws on Mar 27, 2013


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