The impairment argument is incredibly complex. Many employers use the term in workplace drug and alcohol policies but this may not be the most prudent choice as marijuana impairment cannot necessarily be proven beyond a reasonable doubt.

Health Canada Warns Medical Marijuana Producers About Sponsoring Events

Cannabis advertising is subject to several prohibitions in both the Narcotic Control Regulations and the Food and Drugs Act, with paragraph 70(b) of the NCR stating that no person shall publish or cause to be published or furnish any advertisement to the general public respecting a narcotic.

Saying it is "concerned by the decision of some federally licensed producers of cannabis for medical purposes to sponsor events, such as music festivals, and engage in other promotional activities, as reported recently by several Canadian media outlets," Health Canada posted a clear warning about the potential consequences.

"The Government has made its position regarding event and other kinds of corporate sponsorship and other promotional activities abundantly clear, including by setting out prohibitions in the Cannabis Act. Practices that would go against these prohibitions are contrary to the Government's goal to protect public health and public safety, including the goal of protecting young persons and others from inducements to use cannabis as set out in the purpose section of the Act. The actions of some companies have underscored the need for the prohibitions in the Act and their rigorous enforcement," it said.

Cannabis advertising is subject to several prohibitions in both the Narcotic Control Regulations and the Food and Drugs Act, with paragraph 70(b) of the NCR stating that no person shall publish or cause to be published or furnish any advertisement to the general public respecting a narcotic.

The agency said it expects all parties who are authorized to conduct activities with cannabis adhere to the highest standards of professional and ethical conduct and at all times to comply with the law, even as it is reviewing the actions of existing licensed producers and will be taking every possible step to bring them into compliance or prevent non-compliance with existing laws.

Violating the existing prohibitions can result in criminal liability. For example, violating paragraph 70(b) is an offense that now carries a maximum fine of $5 million on indictment or a maximum fine of $250,000 (for a first offense) or $500,000 (for a subsequent offense) on a summary conviction, with the possibility of imprisonment, according to the agency.

OH&S Digital Edition

  • OHS Magazine Digital Edition - June 2020

    June 2020

    Featuring:

    • FIRE SAFETY
      Recognizing and Mitigating Static Electricity Hazards
    • OIL & GAS
      New Gas Detection Technology
    • HEAT STRESS
      Stop Sweating Heat Stress
    • ELECTRICAL SAFETY
      Electricity is Everywhere
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