NJ Aluminum Company Fined $1.9 Million

"Despite its lengthy OSHA history, Aluminum Shapes still does not comply with federal safety and health standards," said Paula Dixon-Roderick, director of OSHA's Marlton Area Office. "These hazards leave workers vulnerable to the risk of serious injury and possible death."

OSHA announced that it has cited a Camden County, N.J., aluminum manufacturing company for 51 health and safety violations and has proposed penalties totaling $1,922,895. The company has "a long history of noncompliance with OSHA standards," according to the agency, which began its inspection of Delair-based Aluminum Shapes, LLC on Jan. 23, 2017.

During the past seven years, OSHA has inspected the facility eight times, cited the employer for 60 violations, and assessed $516,753 in penalties.

The 2017 inspection showed that two employees were hospitalized after separate incidents. The first incident occurred when employees entered a tank to drain residual sludge containing dehydrated sodium hydroxide, aluminum oxide, and decomposed metal. "After reporting to their supervisors that they were experiencing chemical burns to their skin and attempting to wash off the chemicals, employees were directed to re-enter the tank, where they suffered further chemical injuries, resulting in the hospitalization of one employee," OSHA reported. "The second incident occurred when a machine operator suffered a broken pelvis after being caught between the unguarded moving parts of a metal fabrication machine."

OSHA has issued willful citations because of the company's alleged failure to:

  • Provide appropriate PPE
  • Conduct air monitoring prior to permit-required confined space entry
  • Have an attendant during permit-required confined space entry
  • Complete a required confined space entry permit to identify, evaluate, and control hazards in the space
  • Provide confined space training
  • Utilize proper lockout/tagout procedures
  • Provide workers with locks and hardware to lock out equipment being serviced, maintained, or repaired
  • Provide specific procedures for the use of blocking devices
  • Use group lockout procedures
  • Train workers on lockout/tagout

"Despite its lengthy OSHA history, Aluminum Shapes still does not comply with federal safety and health standards," said Paula Dixon-Roderick, director of OSHA's Marlton Area Office. "These hazards leave workers vulnerable to the risk of serious injury and possible death."

OSHA also cited the company for repeat violations that included fall hazards, lack of stair rails and machine guarding, and electrical hazards, as well as issuing serious citations for inadequate ladders, inappropriate respiratory and hearing protection, insufficient entry permits, and lack of machine guarding and hazardous chemical training. Other-than-serious violations included the company’s failure to record each injury on its injury log.

"Aluminum Shapes' extensive list of violations reflects a workplace that does not prioritize worker safety and health," said Robert Kulick, OSHA's regional administrator in New York. "The company can more effectively protect its workers by implementing a comprehensive safety and health management system."

Download Center

  • Safety Metrics Guide

    Is your company leveraging its safety data and analytics to maintain a safe workplace? With so much data available, where do you start? This downloadable guide will give you insight on helpful key performance indicators (KPIs) you should track for your safety program.

  • Job Hazard Analysis Guide

    This guide includes details on how to conduct a thorough Job Hazard Analysis, and it's based directly on an OSHA publication for conducting JHAs. Learn how to identify potential hazards associated with each task of a job and set controls to mitigate hazard risks.

  • A Guide to Practicing “New Safety”

    Learn from safety professionals from around the world as they share their perspectives on various “new views” of safety, including Safety Differently, Safety-II, No Safety, Human and Organizational Performance (HOP), Resilience Engineering, and more in this helpful guide.

  • Lone Worker Safety Guide

    As organizations digitalize and remote operations become more commonplace, the number of lone workers is on the rise. These employees are at increased risk for unaddressed workplace accidents or emergencies. This guide was created to help employers better understand common lone worker risks and solutions for lone worker risk mitigation and incident prevention.

  • EHS Software Buyer's Guide

    Learn the keys to staying organized, staying sharp, and staying one step ahead on all things safety. This buyer’s guide is designed for you to use in your search for the safety management solution that best suits your company’s needs.

  • Vector Solutions

Featured Whitepaper

OH&S Digital Edition

  • OHS Magazine Digital Edition - June 2022

    June 2022

    Featuring:

    • SAFETY CULTURE
      Corporate Safety Culture Is Workplace Culture
    • HEAT STRESS
      Keeping Workers Safe from Heat-Related Illnesses & Injuries
    • EMPLOYEE HEALTH SCREENING
      Should Employers Consider Oral Fluid Drug Testing?
    • PPE FOR WOMEN
      Addressing Physical Differences
    View This Issue