CSX Safety Train Finishes 2014 Tour

Skip Elliott, vice president of public safety, health and environment for CSX, said this year, "we expanded our outreach with first responders and emergency personnel to include training specific to crude oil movements along key routes."

CSX announced Dec. 3 that its safety train has completed its 2014 tour of 18 cities, bringing an energy preparedness program to 2,022 first responders from more than more than 350 public safety organizations in 18 cities. Offered in partnership with the Firefighters Training and Education Foundation, the program educated firefighters, police officers, emergency management professionals, and other first responders about how railcars work and how to respond to rail incidents.

"The Safety Train is just one example of CSX's commitment to helping first responders prepare for potential rail-related incidents," said Skip Elliott, vice president of public safety, health and environment for CSX. "In 2014, we expanded our outreach with first responders and emergency personnel to include training specific to crude oil movements along key routes. Interest from public safety employees was tremendous, and we are happy to have had the chance to partner with so many different agencies."

The train began its tour in Philadelphia in May and made 19 stops in cities along CSX's main freight routes, ending with a return visit to South Kearny, N.J., in November. Other stops included Eddystone, Del.; Garrett, Ind., and Indianapolis; Chicago; Erie, Pa.; Albany, Buffalo, Kingston, New York, Rochester, and Syracuse, N.Y.; Cleveland and Willard, Ohio; Nashville, Tenn.; Richmond, Va.; and Charleston, W.Va.

The CSX Safety Train consisted of a locomotive, four tank cars, one flat car equipped with a variety of tank car valves and fittings, two classroom cars, and a caboose. CSX hazmat specialists conducted training sessions with specific instruction on how crude oil and other hazardous materials are shipped.

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