NTSB Determining Probable Cause of Asiana Crash June 24

Three of the 291 passengers on board died and more than 180 other passengers and crew members were injured when the descending Boeing 777 struck a seawall at the end of runway 28L last July at San Francisco International Airport.

The National Transportation Safety Board has scheduled a June 24 meeting to determine the probable cause of the July 6, 2013, crash of Asiana Airlines Flight 214 while on approach to San Francisco International Airport in California. The aircraft, a Boeing 777, struck a seawall at the end of runway 28L at 11:28 a.m. local time, crashing onto the runway and catching fire. Three of the 291 passengers on board died and more than 180 other passengers and crew members were injured.

The meeting will begin at 9:30 a.m. EDT and will take place in the NTSB Board Room and Conference Center, 429 L'Enfant Plaza SW in Washington, D.C. It will be available as a live webcast, as well; the link to the webcast will be available here shortly before the start of the meeting.

NTSB held an investigative hearing about the crash in December 2013. Asiana Airlines, the Asiana Pilot Union, Boeing, the FAA, and the city and county of San Francisco were parties to the hearing, which focused on topics that included Boeing's design philosophy for the B777 as it relates to awareness of airspeed/energy, Asiana's pilot training on B777 automated systems and its training on performing visual approaches, how the Korean government oversees Asiana's training program, the effects of automation on pilots' workload, and common errors associated with pilots' use of flight deck automation.

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