Curfew Ordered for All U.S. Troops Serving in Japan

U.S. Air Force Lt. Gen. Salvatore Angelella also ordered subordinate commanders to conduct core value retraining for military personnel and for civilians covered in the status of forces agreement between the United States and Japan.

The Pentagon announced Oct. 19 that the commander of U.S. forces in Japan has apologized and ordered a nighttime curfew for all U.S. armed service members serving in Japan following an alleged assault on a Japanese woman in Okinawa by two U.S. service members three days earlier.

"I want to personally apologize for the grief and trauma the victim has endured and the anger it has caused among people in Okinawa," Air Force Lt. Gen. Salvatore A. "Sam" Angelella said in a written statement issued Oct. 19, according to the DoD news release. The New York Times reported the curfew applies to approximately 50,000 uniformed military personnel.

The curfew order requires all members of the U.S. armed forces in Japan, including those serving there on temporary duty, to be on a U.S. military installation, in a private off-installation residence (in the case of people on temporary duty, to be at their place of lodging, which may include a hotel room) from 11 p.m. to 5 a.m. Violations are punishable under the Uniform Code of Military Justice, Angelella's statement said. He also ordered subordinate commanders to conduct core value retraining for military personnel and for civilians covered in the status of forces agreement between the United States and Japan.

According to DoD, he said a review of the U.S. Forces Japan liberty policy will take place over the coming days and weeks. "Japan is one of our greatest allies, most trusted partners, and is the cornerstone of peace and stability in the Pacific region," he said. "We will continue to do all we can to ensure the U.S.-Japan relationship remains strong."

Pentagon Press Secretary George Little issued a statement Oct. 18 expressing regret for the victim and saying officials are working closely with the Japanese government and local officials in their investigation of the alleged assault. "The Department of Defense takes all incidents and allegations involving misconduct by service members seriously and pledges its continued cooperation," Little said. "U.S. Forces Japan is actively engaged with the government of Japan, and the U.S. Navy is fully cooperating with authorities in Okinawa as they continue their investigation."

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