ASSE Releases New Steel Erection Standard for Construction, Demolition Operations

One of the most important revisions to the standard for 2011 is the emphasis on preplanning or building safety into the construction of steel structures.

The American Society of Safety Engineers (ASSE) recently announced the release of the newly published A10.13 American National Standards Institute (ANSI) standard, Safety Requirements for Steel Erection. The A10.13 standard has been updated from a version previously published in 2001 and a comparison document is available for viewing changes. The A10.13 standard was written and developed for companies and craftspeople to be able to erect steel structures and metal decks safely and effectively. Proper planning and execution of erecting steel structures are guided thoroughly by the A10.13.

In a June 2011 interview with ASSE’s Professional Safety, William H. Treharne, A10.13 Subgroup chair and director of engineering and administration for Midwest Steel Inc., noted many risks are associated with erecting steel structures. “Erecting structural steel creates many safety issues. Fall protection is the biggest challenge, but there are many ways to get hurt. Site conditions, electrical wires, and more can all be serious hazards when erecting steel structures and A10.13 provides excellent practices for ensuring risks are minimized and job sites are as safe as possible.”

One of the most important revisions to the standard for 2011 is the emphasis on preplanning or building safety into the construction of steel structures, with the end result being safer jobs and safer job sites for all, according to Treharne. As the industry continues to evolve due to changes in the ways companies do business and technological innovations, the A10.13 subcommittee will continue to reevaluate the standard as necessary in the future to provide the most up-to-date best practices for the industry.

The ANSI/ASSE Accredited Standards Committee serves the construction and demolition industry and the series of A10 standards serve as guides for contractors, labor, and equipment manufacturers in the construction and demolition industry to help make work practices safer for all workers. The A10 standards serve as reference tools for those in the construction and demolition field. ASSE serves as the ANSI secretariat for 10 additional standards committees, working with professionals worldwide to establish best practices for protecting people, property, and the environment. ASSE has published more than 60 standards and has several new standards under development.

For more information about ASSE’s work with ANSI and current standards projects, please visit www.asse.org/publications/standards. The new A10.13 standard is available in print and electronically, and the comparison document for the 2001 and 2011 version of the standard is also available. To purchase the standard or the comparison document package, visit https://www.asse.org/cartpage.php?link=a10_13_2011.

Download Center

HTML - No Current Item Deck
  • Safety Management Software - Free Demo

    IndustrySafe Safety Software’s comprehensive suite of modules help organizations to record and manage incidents, inspections, hazards, behavior based safety observations, and much more. Improve safety with an easy to use tool for tracking, notifying and reporting on key safety data.

  • The Top 5 Safety and Technology Trends to Watch in 2020

    Get the latest on trends you can expect to hear more about in 2020, including continued growth of mobile safety applications, wearable technology, and smart PPE; autonomous vehicles; and increased adoption of international safety standard, ISO 45001.

  • Get the Ultimate Guide to OSHA Recordkeeping

    OSHA’s Form 300A posting deadline is February 1! Are you prepared? To help answer your key recordkeeping questions, IndustrySafe put together this guide with critical compliance information.

  • The 4 Stages of an Incident Investigation

    So, your workplace has just experienced an incident resulting in the injury or illness of a worker. Now what? OSHA recommends that you conduct investigations of workplace incidents using a four-step system.

  • Why Is Near Miss Reporting Important?

    A near miss is an accident that's waiting to happen. Learn how to investigate these close calls and prevent more serious incidents from occurring in the future.

  • Industry Safe
comments powered by Disqus

OH&S Digital Edition

  • OHS Magazine Digital Edition - November December 2019

    November / December 2019

    Featuring:

    • GAS DETECTION
      Redefining Compliance for the Gas Detection Buyer
    • FALL PROTECTION
      Don't Trip Over the Basics
    • VISION PROTECTION
      What to Look for in Head-to-Toe PPE Solutions
    • PROTECTIVE APPAREL
      Effective PPE for Flammable Dust
    View This Issue