OR-OSHA Announces 2010 Workers' Memorial Scholarships

Three of the four students will receive theirs Aug. 19 at a ceremony in Salem. The fourth chose to remain anonymous, the agency said.

Oregon OSHA on Thursday announced four 2010 Workers' Memorial Scholarships will be presented this year, with the ceremony taking place Aug. 19 in Salem, Ore. One of the recipients has chosen to remain anonymous, the agency said. These are scholarships for use during the 2010-2011 school year. Interest earned on a fund derived from OR-OSHA civil fines and penalties pays for them.

Besides the anonymous recipient, the honorees are:

  • Brittany Ford, who attends Oregon State University and is studying to become a dietitian, receiving a $2,500 award. Described in the agency's news release as an avid runner who became interested in her field when she started reading food labels, Ford lost her father when a machine crushed him two weeks after her seventh birthday.
  • Amanda Morris, who will attend Umpqua Community College this fall and hopes to become a nurse, receiving a $2,000 award. She was two years old when her father died in a workplace accident, according to OR-OSHA.
  • Marissa Becker, who attends graduate school at the University of Montana and is working on her master's degree in public health, receiving a $2,000 award. She "was just entering college when her father died from an overexposure to metal dust," the agency said.

Oregon OSHA's Safe Employment Education and Training Advisory Committee makes recommendations for these annual awards, which were set up by the 1991 Legislature at the request of the Oregon AFL-CIO, with support from Associated Oregon Industries. To be eligible, a high school graduate, graduating high school senior, GED recipient, or current college undergraduate or graduate student must be the dependent or spouse of an Oregon worker who has been fatally injured or permanently disabled while on the job. Applicants must be Oregon residents receiving fatality benefits, a dependent or spouse of a fatally injured worker, or the dependent or spouse of an Oregon worker who has incurred a permanent total disability and whose claim for workers' compensation benefits has been accepted.

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