Poison First Aid Guidelines from EPA

In case of an emergency, try to determine what the person was exposed to and what part of the body was affected before you take action, since taking the right action is as important as taking immediate action.

If the person is unconscious having trouble breathing, or having convulsions, give needed first aid immediately. Call 911.or your local emergency service. If the person does not have these symptoms, contact your local Poison Control Center at 1-800-222-1222. Have the product container with you when you call for assistance.

  • Swallowed poison. Induce vomiting. Only if the emergency personnel on the phone tell you to do so. This will depend on what the child has swallowed; some petroleum products or caustic poisons will cause more damage if the victim is made to vomit.
  • Poison in eye. Eye damage can occur, within minutes with some types of pesticide. If poison splashes into an eye, hold the eyelid open and wash quickly and gently with clean, running water from the tap or a gentle stream from a hose for at least 15 minutes. Do not use eye drops or place chemicals or drugs in the wash water.
  • Poison on skin. If pesticide splashes on the skin, drench area with water and remove contaminated clothing. Wash skin and hair thoroughly with soap and water. Later, discard contaminated clothing or thoroughly wash it separately from other laundry.
  • Inhaled poison. Carry or drag victim to fresh air immediately. If you are able to get to the victim because of fumes, immediately contact the Fire Department. Loosen victim's tight clothing. If the victim is blue or has stopped breathing, give artificial respiration (if you know how) and call rescue service for help. Open doors and windows so no one else will be poisoned by fumes.
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  • OHS Magazine Digital Edition - June 2019

    June 2019

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