FDA Requires Additional Labeling for OTC Pain Relievers, Fever Reducers

The Food and Drug Administration issued a final rule on April 28 that requires manufacturers of over-the-counter (OTC) pain relievers and fever reducers to revise their labeling to include warnings about potential safety risks, such as internal bleeding and liver damage, associated with the use of these popular drugs.

Products covered by the FDA action include acetaminophen, and a class of drugs known as the non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). NSAIDs include aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, and ketoprofen. Acetaminophen is in a class by itself. The revised labeling applies to all OTC pain relievers and fever reducers, including those that contain one of these ingredients in combination with other ingredients, such as in cold medicines containing pain relievers or fever reducers.

"Acetaminophen and NSAIDs are commonly used drugs for both children and adults because they are effective in reducing fevers and relieving minor aches and pain, such as headaches and muscle aches," said Charles Ganley, M.D., director, FDA's Office of Nonprescription Drugs in the Center for Drug Evaluation and Research. "However, the risks associated with their use need to be clearly identified on the label so that consumers taking these drugs are fully aware of the potential harm they can cause. It is important that they know how to take these medications safely to reduce their risk."

Under the final rule, manufacturers must ensure that the active ingredients of these drugs are prominently displayed on the drug labels on both the packages and bottles. The labeling also must warn of the risks of stomach bleeding for NSAIDs and severe liver damage for acetaminophen.

Since 2006, some manufacturers have voluntarily revised their product labeling to identify these potential safety concerns; however, the voluntary changes to labeling do not address all of the labeling requirements in the new rule. For example, the new rule includes a warning on products containing acetaminophen that instructs consumers to ask a doctor before they are taking the blood thinning drug warfarin. The new rule requires all manufacturers to re-label their products within one year of the issue date.

An FDA Advisory Committee meeting will be convened on June 29 and 30, 2009, to discuss further steps FDA could take to reduce the risk of liver damage associated with acetaminophen overdoses. To read the final rule, go to www.accessdata.fda.gov/scripts/oc/ohrms/advdisplay.cfm. To read the FR Notice announcing the FDA Advisory Committee meeting, go to www.fda.gov/OHRMS/DOCKETS/98fr/E9-9380.pdf.

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