Tennessee Employers Urged to Be Fire Smart

Tennessee OSHA is asking employers in the state to use October's National Fire Prevention Month observances to become more familiar with ways to prevent workplace fires. In 2007, 1,431 industrial fires caused more than $37 million worth of damage to businesses in Tennessee, killing one person and injuring 38 people, the agency said recently.

Employers should be in compliance with Tennessee Occupational Safety and Health (TOSHA) standards, for starters. "It is our goal to keep both employers and employees as safe as possible in the workplace. Since October is National Fire Prevention Month, we feel it is very important to be aware of some basic safety tips," said John Winkler, TOSHA's administrator.

The agency says employers can lower their risks by doing these things:

* Go over housekeeping procedures for storage and cleanup of flammable waste and materials.
* Control combustible dust.
* Cover procedures for controlling workplace ignition sources, such as smoking, welding, and burning.
* Provide for proper cleaning and maintenance of heat producing equipment, such as burners, heat exchangers, boilers, ovens, and fryers, and require storage of flammables away from this equipment.
* Inform workers of the potential fire hazards in their work area and prepare emergency evacuation procedures.
* Review emergency evacuation procedures with all new employees and whenever the procedure is changed; make sure all employees are aware of the changes

In addition, every workplace must have enough exits suitably located to enable everyone to get out of the facility quickly. Considerations include the type of structure, the number of persons exposed, the fire protection that is available, the type of industry involved, and the height and type of construction of the building or structure. Fire exits must not be blocked or locked when employees are inside. To contact TOSHA consultative services, call 800-249-8510.

Download Center

  • Safety Metrics Guide

    Is your company leveraging its safety data and analytics to maintain a safe workplace? With so much data available, where do you start? This downloadable guide will give you insight on helpful key performance indicators (KPIs) you should track for your safety program.

  • Job Hazard Analysis Guide

    This guide includes details on how to conduct a thorough Job Hazard Analysis, and it's based directly on an OSHA publication for conducting JHAs. Learn how to identify potential hazards associated with each task of a job and set controls to mitigate hazard risks.

  • A Guide to Practicing “New Safety”

    Learn from safety professionals from around the world as they share their perspectives on various “new views” of safety, including Safety Differently, Safety-II, No Safety, Human and Organizational Performance (HOP), Resilience Engineering, and more in this helpful guide.

  • Lone Worker Safety Guide

    As organizations digitalize and remote operations become more commonplace, the number of lone workers is on the rise. These employees are at increased risk for unaddressed workplace accidents or emergencies. This guide was created to help employers better understand common lone worker risks and solutions for lone worker risk mitigation and incident prevention.

  • EHS Software Buyer's Guide

    Learn the keys to staying organized, staying sharp, and staying one step ahead on all things safety. This buyer’s guide is designed for you to use in your search for the safety management solution that best suits your company’s needs.

  • Vector Solutions

Featured Whitepaper

OH&S Digital Edition

  • OHS Magazine Digital Edition - July August 2022

    July / August 2022

    Featuring:

    • CONFINED SPACES
      Specific PPE is Needed for Entry and Exit
    • HAZARD COMMUNICATION
      Three Quick Steps to Better HazCom Training
    • GAS DETECTION
      Building a Chemical Emergency Toolkit
    • RESPIRATORY PROTECTION
      The Last Line of Defense
    View This Issue