Study Credits Responders at Minneapolis Bridge Collapse

The EMS response after sections of an I-35W bridge in Minneapolis collapsed on Aug. 1, 2007, was a success in terms of rescue, recovery, and triage, says a study published in a special issue of the American Medical Association's Disaster Medicine and Public Health Preparedness journal. AMA announced the publication on Wednesday.

"The collapse of the 35W bridge presented unique hazards and logistical challenges to the Minneapolis EMS system," said Dr. John L. Hick, associate professor of Emergency Medicine at the University of Minnesota Medical School and faculty physician at Hennepin County Medical Center in Minneapolis. "The scope of the disaster, the need for multiple transportation and staging areas, and the involvement of multiple aid agencies complicated EMS management, but we were able to use familiar response strategies to help victims quickly."

The collapse killed 13 people, and responders assisted 127 others who were injured. The study of care provided by EMS units and fire departments examines their communications and response plan. "Paramedics based triage on injuries as they would do on a routine basis. All patients arrived at the proper destination and received appropriate triage at the disaster site," AMA noted.

"We are fortunate this tragedy never became a true disaster in that it did not strip community resources to provide appropriate pre-hospital medical care to victims," Hick said. "Reviewing the emergency response to the bridge's collapse will help us, and any city around the country, make improvements to rescue and recovery strategies that will help ensure successful disaster responses in the future."

 

Download Center

  • Safety Metrics Guide

    Is your company leveraging its safety data and analytics to maintain a safe workplace? With so much data available, where do you start? This downloadable guide will give you insight on helpful key performance indicators (KPIs) you should track for your safety program.

  • Job Hazard Analysis Guide

    This guide includes details on how to conduct a thorough Job Hazard Analysis, and it's based directly on an OSHA publication for conducting JHAs. Learn how to identify potential hazards associated with each task of a job and set controls to mitigate hazard risks.

  • A Guide to Practicing “New Safety”

    Learn from safety professionals from around the world as they share their perspectives on various “new views” of safety, including Safety Differently, Safety-II, No Safety, Human and Organizational Performance (HOP), Resilience Engineering, and more in this helpful guide.

  • Lone Worker Safety Guide

    As organizations digitalize and remote operations become more commonplace, the number of lone workers is on the rise. These employees are at increased risk for unaddressed workplace accidents or emergencies. This guide was created to help employers better understand common lone worker risks and solutions for lone worker risk mitigation and incident prevention.

  • EHS Software Buyer's Guide

    Learn the keys to staying organized, staying sharp, and staying one step ahead on all things safety. This buyer’s guide is designed for you to use in your search for the safety management solution that best suits your company’s needs.

  • Vector Solutions

Featured Whitepaper

OH&S Digital Edition

  • OHS Magazine Digital Edition - May 2022

    May 2022

    Featuring:

    • WEARABLE TECHNOLOGY
      How Wearable Technology is Transforming Safety and the Industrial Workplace
    • TRAINING: CONFINED SPACES
      Five Tips to Improve Safety in Confined Spaces
    • INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE
      Monitor for Asbestos to Help Save Lives
    • PPE: FALL PROTECTION
      Fall Protection Can Be Surprising
    View This Issue