2010 Goal of Worksite Health Promotion Programs Doubtful

An article in the August 2008 issue of the American Journal of Public Health suggests one of the government's Healthy People 2010 goals -- to have 75 percent of worksites offering a comprehensive worksite health promotion program -- may not be met. The authors' nationally representative cross-sectional phone survey found that sites with more than 750 employees consistently offered more programs, policies, and services than smaller sites. Only 6.9 percent of responding sites offered a comprehensive program.

The authors are Laura Linnan and Mike Bowling of the Department of Health Behavior and Health Education at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill School of Public Health; Jennifer Childress and Garry Lindsay of the Partnership for Prevention in Washington, D.C.; Carter Blakey and Penelope Royall of the Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion in Rockville, Md.; and Stephanie Pronk and Sharon Wieker, who worked at Watson Wyatt Worldwide in Minneapolis at the time of the study. Their paper says sites with a staff person dedicated to and responsible for health promotion were significantly more likely to offer a comprehensive program. Agriculture, mining, and financial services sites were significantly less likely than those in other industry sectors to offer one.

Increasing the number, quality, and types of health promotion programs at worksites, especially smaller ones, remains an important public health goal, they concluded. The paper is published on pages 1503-1509 in Vol. 98, No. 8 of the journal. For information about the paper, contact Linnan, ScD, CHES, at School of Public Health, University of North Carolina, CB #7440, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-7440, or linnan@email.unc.edu.

Download Center

HTML - No Current Item Deck
  • Free Safety Management Software Demo

    IndustrySafe Safety Management Software helps organizations to improve safety by providing a comprehensive toolset of software modules to help businesses identify trouble spots; reduce claims, lost days, OSHA fines; and more.

  • The Top 5 Safety and Technology Trends to Watch

    Get the latest on trends you can expect to hear more about in 2019, including continued growth of mobile safety applications, wearable technology, and smart PPE; autonomous vehicles; pending OSHA recordkeeping rulemaking; and increased adoption of international safety standard, ISO 45001.

  • Analyze Incident Data

    Collect relevant incident data, analyze trends, and generate accurate regulatory reports, including OSHA 300, 300A, and 301 logs, through IndustrySafe’s extensive incident reporting and investigation module.

  • Safety Training 101

    When it comes to safety training, no matter the industry, there are always questions regarding requirements and certifications. We’ve put together a guide on key safety training topics, requirements for certifications, and answers to common training questions.

  • Conduct EHS Inspections and Audits

    Record and manage your organization’s inspection data with IndustrySafe’s Inspections module. IndustrySafe’s pre-built forms and checklists may be used as is, or can be customized to better suit the needs of your organization.

  • Industry Safe
comments powered by Disqus

OH&S Digital Edition

  • OHS Magazine Digital Edition - January 2019

    January / February 2019

    Featuring:

    • PREVENTING ERRORS
      Production vs. Safety 
    • EMERGENCY SHOWERS & EYEWASH
      Meeting the Requirements for Emergency Equipment
    • CONSTRUCTION SAFETY
      The State of Contractor Safety
    • FOOT PROTECTION
      The Three Keys to Effective Chemical Management
    View This Issue