DOE's Forrestal Headquarters Earns Energy Star

The U.S. Department of Energy's headquarters received Energy Star recognition from EPA on July 9, making it just the second federally owned and operated building in the nation's capital with that designation. U.S. Secretary of Energy Samuel Bodman accepted the plaque for the James Forrestal Headquarters Building, which uses 40 percent less energy than the average office building and prevents the release of 28 million pounds of carbon dioxide emissions each year, according to DOE.

"The U.S. Department of Energy is committed to reducing our energy consumption and using more energy efficient technologies -- everything from energy efficient compact fluorescent light bulbs to driving alternative fuel vehicles," Bodman said. "It is only fitting that the nation's leading researcher on renewable energy and energy efficiency technology is also a leader in putting these vital technologies to use."

To earn Energy Star status, commercial buildings must demonstrate low utility usage and have good indoor air quality and good indoor temperature.  The energy performance 100-point scale, with facilities that achieve a score of 75 being eligible. This score indicates they are among the top 25 percent of facilities nationwide for energy performance.

The Forrestal building's score was 88, DOE said. Energy-saving improvements to the building include energy-efficient motors in the air handling equipment; high-efficiency chilled-water and hot-water pumps; local area network rooms consolidated into central computer areas to reduce air-conditioning requirements; optimized automated HVAC control systems for better temperature control; and energy-efficient lighting in all office spaces, the cafeteria, the main lobby, elevators, janitorial closets, emergency exit signs, and outdoor lighting.

Download Center

  • Safety Metrics Guide

    Is your company leveraging its safety data and analytics to maintain a safe workplace? With so much data available, where do you start? This downloadable guide will give you insight on helpful key performance indicators (KPIs) you should track for your safety program.

  • Job Hazard Analysis Guide

    This guide includes details on how to conduct a thorough Job Hazard Analysis, and it's based directly on an OSHA publication for conducting JHAs. Learn how to identify potential hazards associated with each task of a job and set controls to mitigate hazard risks.

  • A Guide to Practicing “New Safety”

    Learn from safety professionals from around the world as they share their perspectives on various “new views” of safety, including Safety Differently, Safety-II, No Safety, Human and Organizational Performance (HOP), Resilience Engineering, and more in this helpful guide.

  • Lone Worker Safety Guide

    As organizations digitalize and remote operations become more commonplace, the number of lone workers is on the rise. These employees are at increased risk for unaddressed workplace accidents or emergencies. This guide was created to help employers better understand common lone worker risks and solutions for lone worker risk mitigation and incident prevention.

  • EHS Software Buyer's Guide

    Learn the keys to staying organized, staying sharp, and staying one step ahead on all things safety. This buyer’s guide is designed for you to use in your search for the safety management solution that best suits your company’s needs.

  • Vector Solutions

OH&S Digital Edition

  • OHS Magazine Digital Edition - June 2022

    June 2022

    Featuring:

    • SAFETY CULTURE
      Corporate Safety Culture Is Workplace Culture
    • HEAT STRESS
      Keeping Workers Safe from Heat-Related Illnesses & Injuries
    • EMPLOYEE HEALTH SCREENING
      Should Employers Consider Oral Fluid Drug Testing?
    • PPE FOR WOMEN
      Addressing Physical Differences
    View This Issue