OH&S December 2017

December 2017

  • IH/GAS DETECTION: Connect Workers and Technology for Safer, More Efficient Work Sites
  • IH/GAS DETECTION: Portable Gas Detection
  • HAZMAT: What the Standards Require
  • PROTECTIVE APPAREL: Four Parties Affected by NFPA 70E Updates in 2018
  • ELECTRICAL SAFETY: Utilizing Proper Techniques Key to Ensuring Electrical Safety
  • FIRE AND EMERGENCY: The Value of Realistically Testing Your ERP
  • FIRE AND EMERGENCY: Get the Facts About Fire Extinguisher Selection
  • WELDING SAFETY: Tips for Dealing with Respiratory Hazards in Welding
  • LOCKOUT/TAGOUT: Controlling Hazardous Energy with Lockout/Tagout -- Common Challenges and Best Practices
  • VISION PROTECTION: The Economics of Safety Eyewear
  • NEW PRODUCT OF THE YEAR: 2017 NPOY Contest Winners Honored
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Cover Story

To fight any fire effectively, the person operating the extinguisher must be able to move around easily and safely while holding the extinguisher. (Johnson Controls photo)

Get the Facts About Fire Extinguisher Selection

By Sam Boraas

In tough, high-hazard environments, fire extinguishers are put to the test.


Features

The revised HCS standard spells out how to maintain a written HazCom program, how to properly label containers of chemicals and chemical containers that will be shipped to other workplaces, and employee training programs.

What the Standards Require

By Fred Elliott

Both 1910.1200 and 1910.120 are critical to those working with hazardous chemicals and to their supervisors.


In terms of both materials and ergonomics, frame quality is of critical importance when choosing safety eyewear. (Bollé Safety photo)

The Economics of Safety Eyewear

By Peggy Kroesch

Eyewear that is uncomfortable or structurally compromised simply doesn't get worn.


It is worth noting that the process of de-energizing a system is energized work. Until the absence of voltage is verified, any work done is still considered energized and, therefore, requires appropriate hazard protections, such as arc-rated PPE. (Westex by Milliken photo)

Four Parties Affected by NFPA 70E Updates in 2018

By Scott Francis

The updated NFPA 70E can be explored through the lens of parties impacted. Through analyzing party responsibility, safety engineers and managers can make informed decisions to comply.


Training programs always must focus on why it is never acceptable to take shortcuts and "work around" safety codes to complete a job more quickly. (Molex, LLC photo)

Utilizing Proper Technologies Key to Ensuring Electrical Safety

By Tony Quebbemann

Adequate training, protection from exposure, and disciplined use of ground fault circuit interrupters are integral to keeping workers safe.


Most Emergency Response Plans read well on paper but have gaps that typically come to light only when a plant-wide drill is conducted to test the plan.

The Value of Realistically Testing Your ERP

By Chris Koester

Warning! This is a test. This is a test of the Emergency Response Plan.


Portable Gas Detection

Safety should always be of the highest priority—it is the reason these detectors were invented, after all.


A well-run program is the best way to help ensure that your welders are protected from respiratory hazards. (3M photo)

Tips for Dealing with Respiratory Hazards in Welding

By Michael Hallock

After identifying the hazards, the exposure levels from the exposure assessment must be compared to the permissible exposure limit, as set by OSHA, to determine whether respiratory protection is needed.


We congratulate the 23 winners in our ninth annual contest recognizing the most innovative new safety products.

2017 NPOY Contest Winners Honored

By Jerry Laws

We congratulate the 23 winners in our ninth annual contest recognizing the most innovative new safety products.


The 2016 standard was written to be scalable to meet the needs of both large and small companies with varying levels of technology present in their machinery and processes.

Controlling Hazardous Energy with Lockout/Tagout—Common Challenges and Best Practices

By Todd Grover

We have found that only about 10 percent of companies run effective lockout programs. In fact, we have observed that up to three-out-of-ten employers have no lockout program at all.


The safety manager can instantly see, via his or her own smartphone, tablet, laptop, etc., which worker is using which detector. (Honeywell Industrial Safety photo)

Connect Workers and Technology for Safer, More Efficient Work Sites

By Prabhu Soundarrajan

Acquiring the latest software for safety management and monitoring can make a significant difference. The key is connected technology.


Departments

One Tall Order

Wind turbines are getting larger and larger. Some turbines' nacelles can be about 160 meters—about 525 feet—above the ground, and the blades can be about 75 meters long.


The 'Surprising' Realities of Slips, Trips & Falls: What It Takes to Actually Make Significant Improvements

By Robert Pater

What you think helps actually can make things worse. For example, increasing coefficient of friction can increase trips when footing "sticks" on a surface.