May 2015 OH&S

May 2015

  • RESPIRATORY PROTECTION: Professional Trust Should Be Earned
  • EMERGENCY SHOWERS & EYEWASH: Key Considerations for Emergency Equipment
  • INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE: Working with a Hazardous Substance: One Industry's Workplace Safety Success
  • INDUSTRIAL HYGIENE: How Technology Megatrends Are Shaping the Future of Safety, Health, and Environmental Monitoring
  • AIHCE 2015 PREVIEW: Destination: Salt Lake City
  • COMBUSTIBLE DUST: Combustible Dust Vacuums Save Lives and Property
  • DISASTER PREPAREDNESS: Be Prepared for Any Disaster
  • TRAINING: The Role of Training in Your Disaster Preparedness Plan
  • CHEMICAL SAFETY/SDS: Engage Employees in Dusting Off Safety Plans and Procedures
  • CHEMICAL SAFETY/SDS: Common MSDS-to-SDS Conversion Questions
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Cover Story

The flexible polyurethane foam manufacturing industry manages the handling of toluene diisocyanate with PPE, training, and rigorous policies. (Polyurethane Foam Association photo)

Working with a Hazardous Substance: One Industry's Workplace Safety Success

By Michele Ostrove

How the flexible polyurethane foam manufacturing industry manages the handling of toluene diisocyanate.


Features

Pictograms are required safety data sheet elements that are intended to convey specific hazard information visually.

Common MSDS-to-SDS Conversion Questions

By Amanda Yerke

According to OSHA, any chemical that could possibly cause any physical or health effect under expected conditions of use or reasonably anticipated conditions of misuse is hazardous.


Wise executives ensure that all potential exposure is properly prepared for, with compliant equipment.

Key Considerations for Emergency Equipment

By Fred Elliott

Eyewash stations and showers must be easy for an injured person to operate and must work reliably whenever they are needed—so the equipment must be tested weekly.


This breakaway central vacuum can move 10,000 pounds of powder in an hour from 30 feet away if needed. (Air Cleaning Technology photo)

Combustible Dust Vacuums Save Lives and Property

By David Kennedy

Implementing a housekeeping routine to mitigate combustible dust minimizes explosion risk.


Wholesale adoption of GHS hazard classsification principles will disrupt chemical hazard assessment programs and heighten problems manufacturers and importers will face.

Engage Employees in Dusting Off Safety Plans and Procedures

By Karen D. Hamel

Reviews uncover revisions that will need to be made, procedures that will need to be updated, and training that may need to be changed.


The Salt Lake City skyline at night. (Adam Barker/Visit Salt Lake photo)

Destination: Salt Lake City

By Jerry Laws

This year's conference will be year four for the popular Ignite sessions, which are five-minute talks on pretty much any topic.


The convergence of wireless devices, low-cost sensors, Big Data, and crowdsourcing will change the way you assess risk in your workplace.

How Technology Megatrends Are Shaping the Future of Safety, Health, and Environmental Monitoring

By Rob Brauch

The convergence of wireless devices, low-cost sensors, Big Data, and crowdsourcing will change the way you assess risk in your workplace.


Companies in all industries can look to FEMA, the American Red Cross, and other local and federal organizations for information on how to begin creating an emergency preparedness plan.

The Role of Training in Your Disaster Preparedness Plan

By Ralph Metzner

The plan should be considered a living document, reviewed and updated on a regular basis as the emergency team sees fit.


Like a car, a respirator requires maintenance to ensure it remains operable while delivering effective protection.

Professional Trust Should Be Earned

By Luke Allen

CNP systems have demonstrated the ability to accurately and consistently measure known levels of respirator leakage.


Smartphone technology is making it easier for employees to quickly access disaster plans, with or without a WiFi connection.

Be Prepared for Disasters

By Reginald Gates

It is most effective to have one person in charge of creating the emergency preparedness plan.


Departments

Good Ideas Welcome on OSHA's PELs

By Jerry Laws

Updating the PELs is an important issue. OSHA’s RFI is broader than that, encompassing other strategies it could use to address workers’ exposures to hazardous chemicals.


Four-Dimensional Leadership

By Robert Pater

The most Safety- and creatively-effective companies are “Leader-full,” with leadership functions distributed and filled by many people throughout the organization.


How Portable Are Your Safety Efforts?

By Shawn M. Galloway

We need to provide a safe environment for our workers, and we need to coach (providing a balance of consequences for if they act this way and if they don’t) for specific safety performance, as well.